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authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>2016-05-27 17:14:05 -0700
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>2016-05-27 17:14:05 -0700
commitd102a56edba7a3f236454716fa09920e66772044 (patch)
treebfed5508d09028bbf180507b21b8ab25c6980eac /Documentation
parent0121a32201dcc72933fb6019c41661e2f8a02fc5 (diff)
parent3767e255b390d72f9a33c08d9e86c5f21f25860f (diff)
downloadlinux-d102a56edba7a3f236454716fa09920e66772044.tar.gz
Merge branch 'for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/vfs
Pull vfs fixes from Al Viro: "Followups to the parallel lookup work: - update docs - restore killability of the places that used to take ->i_mutex killably now that we have down_write_killable() merged - Additionally, it turns out that I missed a prerequisite for security_d_instantiate() stuff - ->getxattr() wasn't the only thing that could be called before dentry is attached to inode; with smack we needed the same treatment applied to ->setxattr() as well" * 'for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/vfs: switch ->setxattr() to passing dentry and inode separately switch xattr_handler->set() to passing dentry and inode separately restore killability of old mutex_lock_killable(&inode->i_mutex) users add down_write_killable_nested() update D/f/directory-locking
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/filesystems/directory-locking32
-rw-r--r--Documentation/filesystems/porting7
2 files changed, 27 insertions, 12 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/directory-locking b/Documentation/filesystems/directory-locking
index 09bbf9a54f80..c314badbcfc6 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/directory-locking
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/directory-locking
@@ -1,30 +1,37 @@
Locking scheme used for directory operations is based on two
-kinds of locks - per-inode (->i_mutex) and per-filesystem
+kinds of locks - per-inode (->i_rwsem) and per-filesystem
(->s_vfs_rename_mutex).
- When taking the i_mutex on multiple non-directory objects, we
+ When taking the i_rwsem on multiple non-directory objects, we
always acquire the locks in order by increasing address. We'll call
that "inode pointer" order in the following.
For our purposes all operations fall in 5 classes:
1) read access. Locking rules: caller locks directory we are accessing.
+The lock is taken shared.
-2) object creation. Locking rules: same as above.
+2) object creation. Locking rules: same as above, but the lock is taken
+exclusive.
3) object removal. Locking rules: caller locks parent, finds victim,
-locks victim and calls the method.
+locks victim and calls the method. Locks are exclusive.
4) rename() that is _not_ cross-directory. Locking rules: caller locks
-the parent and finds source and target. If target already exists, lock
-it. If source is a non-directory, lock it. If that means we need to
-lock both, lock them in inode pointer order.
+the parent and finds source and target. In case of exchange (with
+RENAME_EXCHANGE in rename2() flags argument) lock both. In any case,
+if the target already exists, lock it. If the source is a non-directory,
+lock it. If we need to lock both, lock them in inode pointer order.
+Then call the method. All locks are exclusive.
+NB: we might get away with locking the the source (and target in exchange
+case) shared.
5) link creation. Locking rules:
* lock parent
* check that source is not a directory
* lock source
* call the method.
+All locks are exclusive.
6) cross-directory rename. The trickiest in the whole bunch. Locking
rules:
@@ -35,11 +42,12 @@ rules:
fail with -ENOTEMPTY
* if new parent is equal to or is a descendent of source
fail with -ELOOP
- * If target exists, lock it. If source is a non-directory, lock
- it. In case that means we need to lock both source and target,
- do so in inode pointer order.
+ * If it's an exchange, lock both the source and the target.
+ * If the target exists, lock it. If the source is a non-directory,
+ lock it. If we need to lock both, do so in inode pointer order.
* call the method.
-
+All ->i_rwsem are taken exclusive. Again, we might get away with locking
+the the source (and target in exchange case) shared.
The rules above obviously guarantee that all directories that are going to be
read, modified or removed by method will be locked by caller.
@@ -73,7 +81,7 @@ objects - A < B iff A is an ancestor of B.
attempt to acquire some lock and already holds at least one lock. Let's
consider the set of contended locks. First of all, filesystem lock is
not contended, since any process blocked on it is not holding any locks.
-Thus all processes are blocked on ->i_mutex.
+Thus all processes are blocked on ->i_rwsem.
By (3), any process holding a non-directory lock can only be
waiting on another non-directory lock with a larger address. Therefore
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/porting b/Documentation/filesystems/porting
index 46f3bb7a02f5..a5fb89cac615 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/porting
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/porting
@@ -578,3 +578,10 @@ in your dentry operations instead.
--
[mandatory]
->atomic_open() calls without O_CREAT may happen in parallel.
+--
+[mandatory]
+ ->setxattr() and xattr_handler.set() get dentry and inode passed separately.
+ dentry might be yet to be attached to inode, so do _not_ use its ->d_inode
+ in the instances. Rationale: !@#!@# security_d_instantiate() needs to be
+ called before we attach dentry to inode and !@#!@##!@$!$#!@#$!@$!@$ smack
+ ->d_instantiate() uses not just ->getxattr() but ->setxattr() as well.