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2016-05-20printk/nmi: generic solution for safe printk in NMIPetr Mladek24-107/+306
printk() takes some locks and could not be used a safe way in NMI context. The chance of a deadlock is real especially when printing stacks from all CPUs. This particular problem has been addressed on x86 by the commit a9edc8809328 ("x86/nmi: Perform a safe NMI stack trace on all CPUs"). The patchset brings two big advantages. First, it makes the NMI backtraces safe on all architectures for free. Second, it makes all NMI messages almost safe on all architectures (the temporary buffer is limited. We still should keep the number of messages in NMI context at minimum). Note that there already are several messages printed in NMI context: WARN_ON(in_nmi()), BUG_ON(in_nmi()), anything being printed out from MCE handlers. These are not easy to avoid. This patch reuses most of the code and makes it generic. It is useful for all messages and architectures that support NMI. The alternative printk_func is set when entering and is reseted when leaving NMI context. It queues IRQ work to copy the messages into the main ring buffer in a safe context. __printk_nmi_flush() copies all available messages and reset the buffer. Then we could use a simple cmpxchg operations to get synchronized with writers. There is also used a spinlock to get synchronized with other flushers. We do not longer use seq_buf because it depends on external lock. It would be hard to make all supported operations safe for a lockless use. It would be confusing and error prone to make only some operations safe. The code is put into separate printk/nmi.c as suggested by Steven Rostedt. It needs a per-CPU buffer and is compiled only on architectures that call nmi_enter(). This is achieved by the new HAVE_NMI Kconfig flag. The are MN10300 and Xtensa architectures. We need to clean up NMI handling there first. Let's do it separately. The patch is heavily based on the draft from Peter Zijlstra, see https://lkml.org/lkml/2015/6/10/327 [arnd@arndb.de: printk-nmi: use %zu format string for size_t] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: min_t->min - all types are size_t here] Signed-off-by: Petr Mladek <pmladek@suse.com> Suggested-by: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Suggested-by: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk+kernel@arm.linux.org.uk> [arm part] Cc: Daniel Thompson <daniel.thompson@linaro.org> Cc: Jiri Kosina <jkosina@suse.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: David Miller <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: Daniel Thompson <daniel.thompson@linaro.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20include/linux/syscalls.h: use pid_t instead of intRené Nyffenegger1-4/+4
In include/linux/syscalls.h, the four functions sys_kill, sys_tgkill, sys_tkill and sys_rt_sigqueueinfo are declared with "int pid" and "int tgid". However, in kernel/signal.c, the corresponding definitions use the more appropriate "pid_t" (which is a typedef'd int). This patch changes "int" to "pid_t" in the declarations of sys_kill, sys_tgkill, sys_tkill and sys_rt_sigqueueinfo in <linux/syscalls.h> in order to harmonize the function declarations with their respective definitions. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/57302FDA.7020205@renenyffenegger.ch Signed-off-by: René Nyffenegger <mail@renenyffenegger.ch> Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@amacapital.net> Cc: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: "Steven Rostedt (Red Hat)" <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Milosz Tanski <milosz@adfin.com> Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20fork: free thread in copy_process on failureJiri Slaby1-1/+3
When using this program (as root): #include <err.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/io.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/wait.h> #define ITER 1000 #define FORKERS 15 #define THREADS (6000/FORKERS) // 1850 is proc max static void fork_100_wait() { unsigned a, to_wait = 0; printf("\t%d forking %d\n", THREADS, getpid()); for (a = 0; a < THREADS; a++) { switch (fork()) { case 0: usleep(1000); exit(0); break; case -1: break; default: to_wait++; break; } } printf("\t%d forked from %d, waiting for %d\n", THREADS, getpid(), to_wait); for (a = 0; a < to_wait; a++) wait(NULL); printf("\t%d waited from %d\n", THREADS, getpid()); } static void run_forkers() { pid_t forkers[FORKERS]; unsigned a; for (a = 0; a < FORKERS; a++) { switch ((forkers[a] = fork())) { case 0: fork_100_wait(); exit(0); break; case -1: err(1, "DIE fork of %d'th forker", a); break; default: break; } } for (a = 0; a < FORKERS; a++) waitpid(forkers[a], NULL, 0); } int main() { unsigned a; int ret; ret = ioperm(10, 20, 0); if (ret < 0) err(1, "ioperm"); for (a = 0; a < ITER; a++) run_forkers(); return 0; } kmemleak reports many occurences of this leak: unreferenced object 0xffff8805917c8000 (size 8192): comm "fork-leak", pid 2932, jiffies 4295354292 (age 1871.028s) hex dump (first 32 bytes): ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ................ ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ................ backtrace: [<ffffffff814cfbf5>] kmemdup+0x25/0x50 [<ffffffff8103ab43>] copy_thread_tls+0x6c3/0x9a0 [<ffffffff81150174>] copy_process+0x1a84/0x5790 [<ffffffff811dc375>] wake_up_new_task+0x2d5/0x6f0 [<ffffffff8115411d>] _do_fork+0x12d/0x820 ... Due to the leakage of the memory items which should have been freed in arch/x86/kernel/process.c:exit_thread(). Make sure the memory is freed when fork fails later in copy_process. This is done by calling exit_thread with the thread to kill. Signed-off-by: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <jejb@parisc-linux.org> Cc: Aurelien Jacquiot <a-jacquiot@ti.com> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Chen Liqin <liqin.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@mellanox.com> Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com> Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn> Cc: Haavard Skinnemoen <hskinnemoen@gmail.com> Cc: Hans-Christian Egtvedt <egtvedt@samfundet.no> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru> Cc: James Hogan <james.hogan@imgtec.com> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Cc: Jesper Nilsson <jesper.nilsson@axis.com> Cc: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: Jonas Bonn <jonas@southpole.se> Cc: Koichi Yasutake <yasutake.koichi@jp.panasonic.com> Cc: Lennox Wu <lennox.wu@gmail.com> Cc: Ley Foon Tan <lftan@altera.com> Cc: Mark Salter <msalter@redhat.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com> Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com> Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu> Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org> Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org> Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at> Cc: Russell King <linux@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Steven Miao <realmz6@gmail.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20exit_thread: accept a task parameter to be exitedJiri Slaby17-47/+42
We need to call exit_thread from copy_process in a fail path. So make it accept task_struct as a parameter. [v2] * s390: exit_thread_runtime_instr doesn't make sense to be called for non-current tasks. * arm: fix the comment in vfp_thread_copy * change 'me' to 'tsk' for task_struct * now we can change only archs that actually have exit_thread [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <jejb@parisc-linux.org> Cc: Aurelien Jacquiot <a-jacquiot@ti.com> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Chen Liqin <liqin.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@mellanox.com> Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com> Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn> Cc: Haavard Skinnemoen <hskinnemoen@gmail.com> Cc: Hans-Christian Egtvedt <egtvedt@samfundet.no> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru> Cc: James Hogan <james.hogan@imgtec.com> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Cc: Jesper Nilsson <jesper.nilsson@axis.com> Cc: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: Jonas Bonn <jonas@southpole.se> Cc: Koichi Yasutake <yasutake.koichi@jp.panasonic.com> Cc: Lennox Wu <lennox.wu@gmail.com> Cc: Ley Foon Tan <lftan@altera.com> Cc: Mark Salter <msalter@redhat.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com> Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com> Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu> Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org> Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org> Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at> Cc: Russell King <linux@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Steven Miao <realmz6@gmail.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20exit_thread: remove empty bodiesJiri Slaby36-140/+24
Define HAVE_EXIT_THREAD for archs which want to do something in exit_thread. For others, let's define exit_thread as an empty inline. This is a cleanup before we change the prototype of exit_thread to accept a task parameter. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips] Signed-off-by: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <jejb@parisc-linux.org> Cc: Aurelien Jacquiot <a-jacquiot@ti.com> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Chen Liqin <liqin.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@mellanox.com> Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com> Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn> Cc: Haavard Skinnemoen <hskinnemoen@gmail.com> Cc: Hans-Christian Egtvedt <egtvedt@samfundet.no> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru> Cc: James Hogan <james.hogan@imgtec.com> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Cc: Jesper Nilsson <jesper.nilsson@axis.com> Cc: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: Jonas Bonn <jonas@southpole.se> Cc: Koichi Yasutake <yasutake.koichi@jp.panasonic.com> Cc: Lennox Wu <lennox.wu@gmail.com> Cc: Ley Foon Tan <lftan@altera.com> Cc: Mark Salter <msalter@redhat.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com> Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com> Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu> Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org> Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org> Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at> Cc: Russell King <linux@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Steven Miao <realmz6@gmail.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mn10300: let exit_fpu accept a taskJiri Slaby2-5/+3
We need to call exit_thread from copy_process in a fail path. Since exit_thread on mn10300 calls exit_thread_runtime_instr, make it accept task_struct as a parameter now. Signed-off-by: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <jejb@parisc-linux.org> Cc: Aurelien Jacquiot <a-jacquiot@ti.com> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Chen Liqin <liqin.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@mellanox.com> Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Fenghua Yu <fenghua.yu@intel.com> Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Guan Xuetao <gxt@mprc.pku.edu.cn> Cc: Haavard Skinnemoen <hskinnemoen@gmail.com> Cc: Hans-Christian Egtvedt <egtvedt@samfundet.no> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru> Cc: James Hogan <james.hogan@imgtec.com> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Cc: Jesper Nilsson <jesper.nilsson@axis.com> Cc: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: Jonas Bonn <jonas@southpole.se> Cc: Koichi Yasutake <yasutake.koichi@jp.panasonic.com> Cc: Lennox Wu <lennox.wu@gmail.com> Cc: Ley Foon Tan <lftan@altera.com> Cc: Mark Salter <msalter@redhat.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com> Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com> Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu> Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org> Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> Cc: Richard Kuo <rkuo@codeaurora.org> Cc: Richard Weinberger <richard@nod.at> Cc: Russell King <linux@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Steven Miao <realmz6@gmail.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20procfs: fix pthread cross-thread naming if !PR_DUMPABLEJanis Danisevskis1-1/+41
The PR_DUMPABLE flag causes the pid related paths of the proc file system to be owned by ROOT. The implementation of pthread_set/getname_np however needs access to /proc/<pid>/task/<tid>/comm. If PR_DUMPABLE is false this implementation is locked out. This patch installs a special permission function for the file "comm" that grants read and write access to all threads of the same group regardless of the ownership of the inode. For all other threads the function falls back to the generic inode permission check. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix spello in comment] Signed-off-by: Janis Danisevskis <jdanis@google.com> Acked-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@openvz.org> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Minfei Huang <mnfhuang@gmail.com> Cc: John Stultz <john.stultz@linaro.org> Cc: Calvin Owens <calvinowens@fb.com> Cc: Jann Horn <jann@thejh.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20procfs: expose umask in /proc/<PID>/statusRichard W.M. Jones2-1/+20
It's not possible to read the process umask without also modifying it, which is what umask(2) does. A library cannot read umask safely, especially if the main program might be multithreaded. Add a new status line ("Umask") in /proc/<PID>/status. It contains the file mode creation mask (umask) in octal. It is only shown for tasks which have task->fs. This patch is adapted from one originally written by Pierre Carrier. The use case is that we have endless trouble with people setting weird umask() values (usually on the grounds of "security"), and then everything breaking. I'm on the hook to fix these. We'd like to add debugging to our program so we can dump out the umask in debug reports. Previous versions of the patch used a syscall so you could only read your own umask. That's all I need. However there was quite a lot of push-back from those, so this new version exports it in /proc. See: https://lkml.org/lkml/2016/4/13/704 [umask2] https://lkml.org/lkml/2016/4/13/487 [getumask] Signed-off-by: Richard W.M. Jones <rjones@redhat.com> Acked-by: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com> Acked-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Acked-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> Cc: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org> Cc: Pierre Carrier <pierre@spotify.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zram: introduce per-device debug_stat sysfs nodeSergey Senozhatsky4-0/+32
debug_stat sysfs is read-only and represents various debugging data that zram developers may need. This file is not meant to be used by anyone else: its content is not documented and will change any time w/o any notice. Therefore, the output of debug_stat file contains a version string. To avoid any confusion, we will increase the version number every time we modify the output. At the moment this file exports only one value -- the number of re-compressions, IOW, the number of times compression fast path has failed. This stat is temporary any will be useful in case if any per-cpu compression streams regressions will be reported. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160513230834.GB26763@bbox Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160511134553.12655-1-sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zram: remove max_comp_streams internalsSergey Senozhatsky4-59/+19
Remove the internal part of max_comp_streams interface, since we switched to per-cpu streams. We will keep RW max_comp_streams attr around, because: a) we may (silently) switch back to idle compression streams list and don't want to disturb user space b) max_comp_streams attr must wait for the next 'lay off cycle'; we give user space 2 years to adjust before we remove/downgrade the attr, and there are already several attrs scheduled for removal in 4.11, so it's too late for max_comp_streams. This slightly change a user visible behaviour: - First, reading from max_comp_stream file now will always return the number of online CPUs. - Second, writing to max_comp_stream will not take any effect. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160503165546.25201-1-sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/zsmalloc: don't fail if can't create debugfs infoDan Streetman1-11/+7
Change the return type of zs_pool_stat_create() to void, and remove the logic to abort pool creation if the stat debugfs dir/file could not be created. The debugfs stat file is for debugging/information only, and doesn't affect operation of zsmalloc; there is no reason to abort creating the pool if the stat file can't be created. This was seen with zswap, which used the same name for all pool creations, which caused zsmalloc to fail to create a second pool for zswap if CONFIG_ZSMALLOC_STAT was enabled. Signed-off-by: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Cc: Dan Streetman <dan.streetman@canonical.com> Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/zswap: use workqueue to destroy poolDan Streetman1-4/+8
Add a work_struct to struct zswap_pool, and change __zswap_pool_empty to use the workqueue instead of using call_rcu(). When zswap destroys a pool no longer in use, it uses call_rcu() to perform the destruction/freeing. Since that executes in softirq context, it must not sleep. However, actually destroying the pool involves freeing the per-cpu compressors (which requires locking the cpu_add_remove_lock mutex) and freeing the zpool, for which the implementation may sleep (e.g. zsmalloc calls kmem_cache_destroy, which locks the slab_mutex). So if either mutex is currently taken, or any other part of the compressor or zpool implementation sleeps, it will result in a BUG(). It's not easy to reproduce this when changing zswap's params normally. In testing with a loaded system, this does not fail: $ cd /sys/module/zswap/parameters $ echo lz4 > compressor ; echo zsmalloc > zpool nor does this: $ while true ; do > echo lzo > compressor ; echo zbud > zpool > sleep 1 > echo lz4 > compressor ; echo zsmalloc > zpool > sleep 1 > done although it's still possible either of those might fail, depending on whether anything else besides zswap has locked the mutexes. However, changing a parameter with no delay immediately causes the schedule while atomic BUG: $ while true ; do > echo lzo > compressor ; echo lz4 > compressor > done This is essentially the same as Yu Zhao's proposed patch to zsmalloc, but moved to zswap, to cover compressor and zpool freeing. Fixes: f1c54846ee45 ("zswap: dynamic pool creation") Signed-off-by: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org> Reported-by: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Cc: Dan Streetman <dan.streetman@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zram: user per-cpu compression streamsSergey Senozhatsky3-231/+116
Remove idle streams list and keep compression streams in per-cpu data. This removes two contented spin_lock()/spin_unlock() calls from write path and also prevent write OP from being preempted while holding the compression stream, which can cause slow downs. For instance, let's assume that we have N cpus and N-2 max_comp_streams.TASK1 owns the last idle stream, TASK2-TASK3 come in with the write requests: TASK1 TASK2 TASK3 zram_bvec_write() spin_lock find stream spin_unlock compress <<preempted>> zram_bvec_write() spin_lock find stream spin_unlock no_stream schedule zram_bvec_write() spin_lock find_stream spin_unlock no_stream schedule spin_lock release stream spin_unlock wake up TASK2 not only TASK2 and TASK3 will not get the stream, TASK1 will be preempted in the middle of its operation; while we would prefer it to finish compression and release the stream. Test environment: x86_64, 4 CPU box, 3G zram, lzo The following fio tests were executed: read, randread, write, randwrite, rw, randrw with the increasing number of jobs from 1 to 10. 4 streams 8 streams per-cpu =========================================================== jobs1 READ: 2520.1MB/s 2566.5MB/s 2491.5MB/s READ: 2102.7MB/s 2104.2MB/s 2091.3MB/s WRITE: 1355.1MB/s 1320.2MB/s 1378.9MB/s WRITE: 1103.5MB/s 1097.2MB/s 1122.5MB/s READ: 434013KB/s 435153KB/s 439961KB/s WRITE: 433969KB/s 435109KB/s 439917KB/s READ: 403166KB/s 405139KB/s 403373KB/s WRITE: 403223KB/s 405197KB/s 403430KB/s jobs2 READ: 7958.6MB/s 8105.6MB/s 8073.7MB/s READ: 6864.9MB/s 6989.8MB/s 7021.8MB/s WRITE: 2438.1MB/s 2346.9MB/s 3400.2MB/s WRITE: 1994.2MB/s 1990.3MB/s 2941.2MB/s READ: 981504KB/s 973906KB/s 1018.8MB/s WRITE: 981659KB/s 974060KB/s 1018.1MB/s READ: 937021KB/s 938976KB/s 987250KB/s WRITE: 934878KB/s 936830KB/s 984993KB/s jobs3 READ: 13280MB/s 13553MB/s 13553MB/s READ: 11534MB/s 11785MB/s 11755MB/s WRITE: 3456.9MB/s 3469.9MB/s 4810.3MB/s WRITE: 3029.6MB/s 3031.6MB/s 4264.8MB/s READ: 1363.8MB/s 1362.6MB/s 1448.9MB/s WRITE: 1361.9MB/s 1360.7MB/s 1446.9MB/s READ: 1309.4MB/s 1310.6MB/s 1397.5MB/s WRITE: 1307.4MB/s 1308.5MB/s 1395.3MB/s jobs4 READ: 20244MB/s 20177MB/s 20344MB/s READ: 17886MB/s 17913MB/s 17835MB/s WRITE: 4071.6MB/s 4046.1MB/s 6370.2MB/s WRITE: 3608.9MB/s 3576.3MB/s 5785.4MB/s READ: 1824.3MB/s 1821.6MB/s 1997.5MB/s WRITE: 1819.8MB/s 1817.4MB/s 1992.5MB/s READ: 1765.7MB/s 1768.3MB/s 1937.3MB/s WRITE: 1767.5MB/s 1769.1MB/s 1939.2MB/s jobs5 READ: 18663MB/s 18986MB/s 18823MB/s READ: 16659MB/s 16605MB/s 16954MB/s WRITE: 3912.4MB/s 3888.7MB/s 6126.9MB/s WRITE: 3506.4MB/s 3442.5MB/s 5519.3MB/s READ: 1798.2MB/s 1746.5MB/s 1935.8MB/s WRITE: 1792.7MB/s 1740.7MB/s 1929.1MB/s READ: 1727.6MB/s 1658.2MB/s 1917.3MB/s WRITE: 1726.5MB/s 1657.2MB/s 1916.6MB/s jobs6 READ: 21017MB/s 20922MB/s 21162MB/s READ: 19022MB/s 19140MB/s 18770MB/s WRITE: 3968.2MB/s 4037.7MB/s 6620.8MB/s WRITE: 3643.5MB/s 3590.2MB/s 6027.5MB/s READ: 1871.8MB/s 1880.5MB/s 2049.9MB/s WRITE: 1867.8MB/s 1877.2MB/s 2046.2MB/s READ: 1755.8MB/s 1710.3MB/s 1964.7MB/s WRITE: 1750.5MB/s 1705.9MB/s 1958.8MB/s jobs7 READ: 21103MB/s 20677MB/s 21482MB/s READ: 18522MB/s 18379MB/s 19443MB/s WRITE: 4022.5MB/s 4067.4MB/s 6755.9MB/s WRITE: 3691.7MB/s 3695.5MB/s 5925.6MB/s READ: 1841.5MB/s 1933.9MB/s 2090.5MB/s WRITE: 1842.7MB/s 1935.3MB/s 2091.9MB/s READ: 1832.4MB/s 1856.4MB/s 1971.5MB/s WRITE: 1822.3MB/s 1846.2MB/s 1960.6MB/s jobs8 READ: 20463MB/s 20194MB/s 20862MB/s READ: 18178MB/s 17978MB/s 18299MB/s WRITE: 4085.9MB/s 4060.2MB/s 7023.8MB/s WRITE: 3776.3MB/s 3737.9MB/s 6278.2MB/s READ: 1957.6MB/s 1944.4MB/s 2109.5MB/s WRITE: 1959.2MB/s 1946.2MB/s 2111.4MB/s READ: 1900.6MB/s 1885.7MB/s 2082.1MB/s WRITE: 1896.2MB/s 1881.4MB/s 2078.3MB/s jobs9 READ: 19692MB/s 19734MB/s 19334MB/s READ: 17678MB/s 18249MB/s 17666MB/s WRITE: 4004.7MB/s 4064.8MB/s 6990.7MB/s WRITE: 3724.7MB/s 3772.1MB/s 6193.6MB/s READ: 1953.7MB/s 1967.3MB/s 2105.6MB/s WRITE: 1953.4MB/s 1966.7MB/s 2104.1MB/s READ: 1860.4MB/s 1897.4MB/s 2068.5MB/s WRITE: 1858.9MB/s 1895.9MB/s 2066.8MB/s jobs10 READ: 19730MB/s 19579MB/s 19492MB/s READ: 18028MB/s 18018MB/s 18221MB/s WRITE: 4027.3MB/s 4090.6MB/s 7020.1MB/s WRITE: 3810.5MB/s 3846.8MB/s 6426.8MB/s READ: 1956.1MB/s 1994.6MB/s 2145.2MB/s WRITE: 1955.9MB/s 1993.5MB/s 2144.8MB/s READ: 1852.8MB/s 1911.6MB/s 2075.8MB/s WRITE: 1855.7MB/s 1914.6MB/s 2078.1MB/s perf stat 4 streams 8 streams per-cpu ==================================================================================================================== jobs1 stalled-cycles-frontend 23,174,811,209 ( 38.21%) 23,220,254,188 ( 38.25%) 23,061,406,918 ( 38.34%) stalled-cycles-backend 11,514,174,638 ( 18.98%) 11,696,722,657 ( 19.27%) 11,370,852,810 ( 18.90%) instructions 73,925,005,782 ( 1.22) 73,903,177,632 ( 1.22) 73,507,201,037 ( 1.22) branches 14,455,124,835 ( 756.063) 14,455,184,779 ( 755.281) 14,378,599,509 ( 758.546) branch-misses 69,801,336 ( 0.48%) 80,225,529 ( 0.55%) 72,044,726 ( 0.50%) jobs2 stalled-cycles-frontend 49,912,741,782 ( 46.11%) 50,101,189,290 ( 45.95%) 32,874,195,633 ( 35.11%) stalled-cycles-backend 27,080,366,230 ( 25.02%) 27,949,970,232 ( 25.63%) 16,461,222,706 ( 17.58%) instructions 122,831,629,690 ( 1.13) 122,919,846,419 ( 1.13) 121,924,786,775 ( 1.30) branches 23,725,889,239 ( 692.663) 23,733,547,140 ( 688.062) 23,553,950,311 ( 794.794) branch-misses 90,733,041 ( 0.38%) 96,320,895 ( 0.41%) 84,561,092 ( 0.36%) jobs3 stalled-cycles-frontend 66,437,834,608 ( 45.58%) 63,534,923,344 ( 43.69%) 42,101,478,505 ( 33.19%) stalled-cycles-backend 34,940,799,661 ( 23.97%) 34,774,043,148 ( 23.91%) 21,163,324,388 ( 16.68%) instructions 171,692,121,862 ( 1.18) 171,775,373,044 ( 1.18) 170,353,542,261 ( 1.34) branches 32,968,962,622 ( 628.723) 32,987,739,894 ( 630.512) 32,729,463,918 ( 717.027) branch-misses 111,522,732 ( 0.34%) 110,472,894 ( 0.33%) 99,791,291 ( 0.30%) jobs4 stalled-cycles-frontend 98,741,701,675 ( 49.72%) 94,797,349,965 ( 47.59%) 54,535,655,381 ( 33.53%) stalled-cycles-backend 54,642,609,615 ( 27.51%) 55,233,554,408 ( 27.73%) 27,882,323,541 ( 17.14%) instructions 220,884,807,851 ( 1.11) 220,930,887,273 ( 1.11) 218,926,845,851 ( 1.35) branches 42,354,518,180 ( 592.105) 42,362,770,587 ( 590.452) 41,955,552,870 ( 716.154) branch-misses 138,093,449 ( 0.33%) 131,295,286 ( 0.31%) 121,794,771 ( 0.29%) jobs5 stalled-cycles-frontend 116,219,747,212 ( 48.14%) 110,310,397,012 ( 46.29%) 66,373,082,723 ( 33.70%) stalled-cycles-backend 66,325,434,776 ( 27.48%) 64,157,087,914 ( 26.92%) 32,999,097,299 ( 16.76%) instructions 270,615,008,466 ( 1.12) 270,546,409,525 ( 1.14) 268,439,910,948 ( 1.36) branches 51,834,046,557 ( 599.108) 51,811,867,722 ( 608.883) 51,412,576,077 ( 729.213) branch-misses 158,197,086 ( 0.31%) 142,639,805 ( 0.28%) 133,425,455 ( 0.26%) jobs6 stalled-cycles-frontend 138,009,414,492 ( 48.23%) 139,063,571,254 ( 48.80%) 75,278,568,278 ( 32.80%) stalled-cycles-backend 79,211,949,650 ( 27.68%) 79,077,241,028 ( 27.75%) 37,735,797,899 ( 16.44%) instructions 319,763,993,731 ( 1.12) 319,937,782,834 ( 1.12) 316,663,600,784 ( 1.38) branches 61,219,433,294 ( 595.056) 61,250,355,540 ( 598.215) 60,523,446,617 ( 733.706) branch-misses 169,257,123 ( 0.28%) 154,898,028 ( 0.25%) 141,180,587 ( 0.23%) jobs7 stalled-cycles-frontend 162,974,812,119 ( 49.20%) 159,290,061,987 ( 48.43%) 88,046,641,169 ( 33.21%) stalled-cycles-backend 92,223,151,661 ( 27.84%) 91,667,904,406 ( 27.87%) 44,068,454,971 ( 16.62%) instructions 369,516,432,430 ( 1.12) 369,361,799,063 ( 1.12) 365,290,380,661 ( 1.38) branches 70,795,673,950 ( 594.220) 70,743,136,124 ( 597.876) 69,803,996,038 ( 732.822) branch-misses 181,708,327 ( 0.26%) 165,767,821 ( 0.23%) 150,109,797 ( 0.22%) jobs8 stalled-cycles-frontend 185,000,017,027 ( 49.30%) 182,334,345,473 ( 48.37%) 99,980,147,041 ( 33.26%) stalled-cycles-backend 105,753,516,186 ( 28.18%) 107,937,830,322 ( 28.63%) 51,404,177,181 ( 17.10%) instructions 418,153,161,055 ( 1.11) 418,308,565,828 ( 1.11) 413,653,475,581 ( 1.38) branches 80,035,882,398 ( 592.296) 80,063,204,510 ( 589.843) 79,024,105,589 ( 730.530) branch-misses 199,764,528 ( 0.25%) 177,936,926 ( 0.22%) 160,525,449 ( 0.20%) jobs9 stalled-cycles-frontend 210,941,799,094 ( 49.63%) 204,714,679,254 ( 48.55%) 114,251,113,756 ( 33.96%) stalled-cycles-backend 122,640,849,067 ( 28.85%) 122,188,553,256 ( 28.98%) 58,360,041,127 ( 17.35%) instructions 468,151,025,415 ( 1.10) 467,354,869,323 ( 1.11) 462,665,165,216 ( 1.38) branches 89,657,067,510 ( 585.628) 89,411,550,407 ( 588.990) 88,360,523,943 ( 730.151) branch-misses 218,292,301 ( 0.24%) 191,701,247 ( 0.21%) 178,535,678 ( 0.20%) jobs10 stalled-cycles-frontend 233,595,958,008 ( 49.81%) 227,540,615,689 ( 49.11%) 160,341,979,938 ( 43.07%) stalled-cycles-backend 136,153,676,021 ( 29.03%) 133,635,240,742 ( 28.84%) 65,909,135,465 ( 17.70%) instructions 517,001,168,497 ( 1.10) 516,210,976,158 ( 1.11) 511,374,038,613 ( 1.37) branches 98,911,641,329 ( 585.796) 98,700,069,712 ( 591.583) 97,646,761,028 ( 728.712) branch-misses 232,341,823 ( 0.23%) 199,256,308 ( 0.20%) 183,135,268 ( 0.19%) per-cpu streams tend to cause significantly less stalled cycles; execute less branches and hit less branch-misses. perf stat reported execution time 4 streams 8 streams per-cpu ==================================================================== jobs1 seconds elapsed 20.909073870 20.875670495 20.817838540 jobs2 seconds elapsed 18.529488399 18.720566469 16.356103108 jobs3 seconds elapsed 18.991159531 18.991340812 16.766216066 jobs4 seconds elapsed 19.560643828 19.551323547 16.246621715 jobs5 seconds elapsed 24.746498464 25.221646740 20.696112444 jobs6 seconds elapsed 28.258181828 28.289765505 22.885688857 jobs7 seconds elapsed 32.632490241 31.909125381 26.272753738 jobs8 seconds elapsed 35.651403851 36.027596308 29.108024711 jobs9 seconds elapsed 40.569362365 40.024227989 32.898204012 jobs10 seconds elapsed 44.673112304 43.874898137 35.632952191 Please see Link: http://marc.info/?l=linux-kernel&m=146166970727530 Link: http://marc.info/?l=linux-kernel&m=146174716719650 for more test results (under low memory conditions). Signed-off-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Suggested-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zsmalloc: require GFP in zs_malloc()Sergey Senozhatsky3-15/+17
Pass GFP flags to zs_malloc() instead of using a fixed mask supplied to zs_create_pool(), so we can be more flexible, but, more importantly, we need this to switch zram to per-cpu compression streams -- zram will try to allocate handle with preemption disabled in a fast path and switch to a slow path (using different gfp mask) if the fast one has failed. Apart from that, this also align zs_malloc() interface with zspool/zbud. [sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com: pass GFP flags to zs_malloc() instead of using a fixed mask] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160429150942.GA637@swordfish Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160429150942.GA637@swordfish Signed-off-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Acked-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zsmalloc: remove unused pool param in obj_freeMinchan Kim1-4/+3
Let's remove unused pool param in obj_free Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zsmalloc: reorder function parametersMinchan Kim1-24/+26
Clean up function parameter ordering to order higher data structure first. Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zsmalloc: clean up many BUG_ONMinchan Kim1-27/+15
There are many BUG_ON in zsmalloc.c which is not recommened so change them as alternatives. Normal rule is as follows: 1. avoid BUG_ON if possible. Instead, use VM_BUG_ON or VM_BUG_ON_PAGE 2. use VM_BUG_ON_PAGE if we need to see struct page's fields 3. use those assertion in primitive functions so higher functions can rely on the assertion in the primitive function. 4. Don't use assertion if following instruction can trigger Oops Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20zsmalloc: use first_page rather than pageMinchan Kim1-30/+32
Clean up function parameter "struct page". Many functions of zsmalloc expect that page paramter is "first_page" so use "first_page" rather than "page" for code readability. Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Reviewed-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20kasan/tests: add tests for user memory access functionsAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+49
Add some tests for the newly-added user memory access API. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462538722-1574-1-git-send-email-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20x86/kasan: instrument user memory access APIAndrey Ryabinin3-0/+14
Exchange between user and kernel memory is coded in assembly language. Which means that such accesses won't be spotted by KASAN as a compiler instruments only C code. Add explicit KASAN checks to user memory access API to ensure that userspace writes to (or reads from) a valid kernel memory. Note: Unlike others strncpy_from_user() is written mostly in C and KASAN sees memory accesses in it. However, it makes sense to add explicit check for all @count bytes that *potentially* could be written to the kernel. [aryabinin@virtuozzo.com: move kasan check under the condition] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462869209-21096-1-git-send-email-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462538722-1574-4-git-send-email-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/kasan: add API to check memory regionsAndrey Ryabinin3-1/+25
Memory access coded in an assembly won't be seen by KASAN as a compiler can instrument only C code. Add kasan_check_[read,write]() API which is going to be used to check a certain memory range. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462538722-1574-3-git-send-email-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/kasan: print name of mem[set,cpy,move]() caller in reportAndrey Ryabinin1-30/+34
When bogus memory access happens in mem[set,cpy,move]() it's usually caller's fault. So don't blame mem[set,cpy,move]() in bug report, blame the caller instead. Before: BUG: KASAN: out-of-bounds access in memset+0x23/0x40 at <address> After: BUG: KASAN: out-of-bounds access in <memset_caller> at <address> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462538722-1574-2-git-send-email-aryabinin@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm, kasan: add a ksize() testAlexander Potapenko1-0/+20
Add a test that makes sure ksize() unpoisons the whole chunk. Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm, kasan: don't call kasan_krealloc() from ksize().Alexander Potapenko2-3/+4
Instead of calling kasan_krealloc(), which replaces the memory allocation stack ID (if stack depot is used), just unpoison the whole memory chunk. Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: kasan: initial memory quarantine implementationAlexander Potapenko10-15/+387
Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. When the object is freed, its state changes from KASAN_STATE_ALLOC to KASAN_STATE_QUARANTINE. The object is poisoned and put into quarantine instead of being returned to the allocator, therefore every subsequent access to that object triggers a KASAN error, and the error handler is able to say where the object has been allocated and deallocated. When it's time for the object to leave quarantine, its state becomes KASAN_STATE_FREE and it's returned to the allocator. From now on the allocator may reuse it for another allocation. Before that happens, it's still possible to detect a use-after free on that object (it retains the allocation/deallocation stacks). When the allocator reuses this object, the shadow is unpoisoned and old allocation/deallocation stacks are wiped. Therefore a use of this object, even an incorrect one, won't trigger ASan warning. Without the quarantine, it's not guaranteed that the objects aren't reused immediately, that's why the probability of catching a use-after-free is lower than with quarantine in place. Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. Freed objects are first added to per-cpu quarantine queues. When a cache is destroyed or memory shrinking is requested, the objects are moved into the global quarantine queue. Whenever a kmalloc call allows memory reclaiming, the oldest objects are popped out of the global queue until the total size of objects in quarantine is less than 3/4 of the maximum quarantine size (which is a fraction of installed physical memory). As long as an object remains in the quarantine, KASAN is able to report accesses to it, so the chance of reporting a use-after-free is increased. Once the object leaves quarantine, the allocator may reuse it, in which case the object is unpoisoned and KASAN can't detect incorrect accesses to it. Right now quarantine support is only enabled in SLAB allocator. Unification of KASAN features in SLAB and SLUB will be done later. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: quarantine" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. A number of improvements have been suggested by Andrey Ryabinin. [glider@google.com: v9] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462987130-144092-1-git-send-email-glider@google.com Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: call page_ext_init() after all struct pages are initializedYang Shi1-1/+2
When DEFERRED_STRUCT_PAGE_INIT is enabled, just a subset of memmap at boot are initialized, then the rest are initialized in parallel by starting one-off "pgdatinitX" kernel thread for each node X. If page_ext_init is called before it, some pages will not have valid extension, this may lead the below kernel oops when booting up kernel: BUG: unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at (null) IP: [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 PGD 0 Oops: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP DEBUG_PAGEALLOC Modules linked in: CPU: 11 PID: 106 Comm: pgdatinit1 Not tainted 4.6.0-rc5-next-20160427 #26 Hardware name: Intel Corporation S5520HC/S5520HC, BIOS S5500.86B.01.10.0025.030220091519 03/02/2009 task: ffff88017c080040 ti: ffff88017c084000 task.ti: ffff88017c084000 RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8118d982>] [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 RSP: 0000:ffff88017c087c48 EFLAGS: 00010046 RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: 0000000000000000 RCX: 0000000000000001 RDX: 0000000000000980 RSI: 0000000000000080 RDI: 0000000000660401 RBP: ffff88017c087cd0 R08: 0000000000000401 R09: 0000000000000009 R10: ffff88017c080040 R11: 000000000000000a R12: 0000000000000400 R13: ffffea0019810000 R14: ffffea0019810040 R15: ffff88066cfe6080 FS: 0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff88066cd40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000 CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033 CR2: 0000000000000000 CR3: 0000000002406000 CR4: 00000000000006e0 Call Trace: free_hot_cold_page+0x192/0x1d0 __free_pages+0x5c/0x90 __free_pages_boot_core+0x11a/0x14e deferred_free_range+0x50/0x62 deferred_init_memmap+0x220/0x3c3 kthread+0xf8/0x110 ret_from_fork+0x22/0x40 Code: 49 89 d4 48 c1 e0 06 49 01 c5 e9 de fe ff ff 4c 89 f7 44 89 4d b8 4c 89 45 c0 44 89 5d c8 48 89 4d d0 e8 62 c7 07 00 48 8b 4d d0 <48> 8b 00 44 8b 5d c8 4c 8b 45 c0 44 8b 4d b8 a8 02 0f 84 05 ff RIP [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 RSP <ffff88017c087c48> CR2: 0000000000000000 Move page_ext_init() after page_alloc_init_late() to make sure page extension is setup for all pages. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463696006-31360-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linaro.org Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linaro.org> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm, migrate: increment fail count on ENOMEMDavid Rientjes1-0/+1
If page migration fails due to -ENOMEM, nr_failed should still be incremented for proper statistics. This was encountered recently when all page migration vmstats showed 0, and inferred that migrate_pages() was never called, although in reality the first page migration failed because compaction_alloc() failed to find a migration target. This patch increments nr_failed so the vmstat is properly accounted on ENOMEM. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.DEB.2.10.1605191510230.32658@chino.kir.corp.google.com Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/compaction.c: fix zoneindex in kcompactd()Chen Feng1-2/+2
While testing the kcompactd in my platform 3G MEM only DMA ZONE. I found the kcompactd never wakeup. It seems the zoneindex has already minus 1 before. So the traverse here should be <=. It fixes a regression where kswapd could previously compact, but kcompactd not. Not a crash fix though. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix kcompactd_do_work() as well, per Hugh] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463659121-84124-1-git-send-email-puck.chen@hisilicon.com Fixes: accf62422b3a ("mm, kswapd: replace kswapd compaction with waking up kcompactd") Signed-off-by: Chen Feng <puck.chen@hisilicon.com> Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org> Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Zhuangluan Su <suzhuangluan@hisilicon.com> Cc: Yiping Xu <xuyiping@hisilicon.com> Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: page_is_guard(): return false when page_ext arrays are not allocated yetYang Shi1-0/+3
When enabling the below kernel configs: CONFIG_DEFERRED_STRUCT_PAGE_INIT CONFIG_DEBUG_PAGEALLOC CONFIG_PAGE_EXTENSION CONFIG_DEBUG_VM kernel bootup may fail due to the following oops: BUG: unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at (null) IP: [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 PGD 0 Oops: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP DEBUG_PAGEALLOC Modules linked in: CPU: 11 PID: 106 Comm: pgdatinit1 Not tainted 4.6.0-rc5-next-20160427 #26 Hardware name: Intel Corporation S5520HC/S5520HC, BIOS S5500.86B.01.10.0025.030220091519 03/02/2009 task: ffff88017c080040 ti: ffff88017c084000 task.ti: ffff88017c084000 RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8118d982>] [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 RSP: 0000:ffff88017c087c48 EFLAGS: 00010046 RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: 0000000000000000 RCX: 0000000000000001 RDX: 0000000000000980 RSI: 0000000000000080 RDI: 0000000000660401 RBP: ffff88017c087cd0 R08: 0000000000000401 R09: 0000000000000009 R10: ffff88017c080040 R11: 000000000000000a R12: 0000000000000400 R13: ffffea0019810000 R14: ffffea0019810040 R15: ffff88066cfe6080 FS: 0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff88066cd40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000 CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033 CR2: 0000000000000000 CR3: 0000000002406000 CR4: 00000000000006e0 Call Trace: free_hot_cold_page+0x192/0x1d0 __free_pages+0x5c/0x90 __free_pages_boot_core+0x11a/0x14e deferred_free_range+0x50/0x62 deferred_init_memmap+0x220/0x3c3 kthread+0xf8/0x110 ret_from_fork+0x22/0x40 Code: 49 89 d4 48 c1 e0 06 49 01 c5 e9 de fe ff ff 4c 89 f7 44 89 4d b8 4c 89 45 c0 44 89 5d c8 48 89 4d d0 e8 62 c7 07 00 48 8b 4d d0 <48> 8b 00 44 8b 5d c8 4c 8b 45 c0 44 8b 4d b8 a8 02 0f 84 05 ff RIP [<ffffffff8118d982>] free_pcppages_bulk+0x2d2/0x8d0 RSP <ffff88017c087c48> CR2: 0000000000000000 The problem is lookup_page_ext() returns NULL then page_is_guard() tried to access it in page freeing. page_is_guard() depends on PAGE_EXT_DEBUG_GUARD bit of page extension flag, but freeing page might reach here before the page_ext arrays are allocated when feeding a range of pages to the allocator for the first time during bootup or memory hotplug. When it returns NULL, page_is_guard() should just return false instead of checking PAGE_EXT_DEBUG_GUARD unconditionally. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463610225-29060-1-git-send-email-yang.shi@linaro.org Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linaro.org> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm, thp: khugepaged should scan when sleep value is writtenDavid Rientjes1-3/+16
If a large value is written to scan_sleep_millisecs, for example, that period must lapse before khugepaged will wake up for periodic collapsing. If this value is tuned to 1 day, for example, and then re-tuned to its default 10s, khugepaged will still wait for a day before scanning again. This patch causes khugepaged to wakeup immediately when the value is changed and then sleep until that value is rewritten or the new value lapses. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.DEB.2.10.1605181453200.4786@chino.kir.corp.google.com Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20MM: increase safety margin provided by PF_LESS_THROTTLENeilBrown1-2/+2
When nfsd is exporting a filesystem over NFS which is then NFS-mounted on the local machine there is a risk of deadlock. This happens when there are lots of dirty pages in the NFS filesystem and they cause NFSD to be throttled, either in throttle_vm_writeout() or in balance_dirty_pages(). To avoid this problem the PF_LESS_THROTTLE flag is set for NFSD threads and it provides a 25% increase to the limits that affect NFSD. Any process writing to an NFS filesystem will be throttled well before the number of dirty NFS pages reaches the limit imposed on NFSD, so NFSD will not deadlock on pages that it needs to write out. At least it shouldn't. All processes are allowed a small excess margin to avoid performing too many calculations: ratelimit_pages. ratelimit_pages is set so that if a thread on every CPU uses the entire margin, the total will only go 3% over the limit, and this is much less than the 25% bonus that PF_LESS_THROTTLE provides, so this margin shouldn't be a problem. But it is. The "total memory" that these 3% and 25% are calculated against are not really total memory but are "global_dirtyable_memory()" which doesn't include anonymous memory, just free memory and page-cache memory. The "ratelimit_pages" number is based on whatever the global_dirtyable_memory was on the last CPU hot-plug, which might not be what you expect, but is probably close to the total freeable memory. The throttle threshold uses the global_dirtable_memory at the moment when the throttling happens, which could be much less than at the last CPU hotplug. So if lots of anonymous memory has been allocated, thus pushing out lots of page-cache pages, then NFSD might end up being throttled due to dirty NFS pages because the "25%" bonus it gets is calculated against a rather small amount of dirtyable memory, while the "3%" margin that other processes are allowed to dirty without penalty is calculated against a much larger number. To remove this possibility of deadlock we need to make sure that the margin granted to PF_LESS_THROTTLE exceeds that rate-limit margin. Simply adding ratelimit_pages isn't enough as that should be multiplied by the number of cpus. So add "global_wb_domain.dirty_limit / 32" as that more accurately reflects the current total over-shoot margin. This ensures that the number of dirty NFS pages never gets so high that nfsd will be throttled waiting for them to be written. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/87futgowwv.fsf@notabene.neil.brown.name Signed-off-by: NeilBrown <neilb@suse.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: check_new_page_bad() directly returns in __PG_HWPOISON caseNaoya Horiguchi1-6/+3
Currently we check page->flags twice for "HWPoisoned" case of check_new_page_bad(), which can cause a race with unpoisoning. This race unnecessarily taints kernel with "BUG: Bad page state". check_new_page_bad() is the only caller of bad_page() which is interested in __PG_HWPOISON, so let's move the hwpoison related code in bad_page() to it. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160518100949.GA17299@hori1.linux.bs1.fc.nec.co.jp Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com> Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net> Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm, kasan: fix to call kasan_free_pages() after poisoning pageseokhoon.yoon1-1/+1
When CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING and CONFIG_KASAN is enabled, free_pages_prepare()'s codeflow is below. 1)kmemcheck_free_shadow() 2)kasan_free_pages() - set shadow byte of page is freed 3)kernel_poison_pages() 3.1) check access to page is valid or not using kasan ---> error occur, kasan think it is invalid access 3.2) poison page 4)kernel_map_pages() So kasan_free_pages() should be called after poisoning the page. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463220405-7455-1-git-send-email-iamyooon@gmail.com Signed-off-by: seokhoon.yoon <iamyooon@gmail.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Cc: Laura Abbott <labbott@fedoraproject.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: disable fault around on emulated access bit architectureMinchan Kim1-0/+8
fault_around aims to reduce minor faults of file-backed pages via speculative ahead pte mapping and relying on readahead logic. However, on non-HW access bit architecture the benefit is highly limited because they should emulate the young bit with minor faults for reclaim's page aging algorithm. IOW, we cannot reduce minor faults on those architectures. I did quick a test on my ARM machine. 512M file mmap sequential every word read on eSATA drive 4 times. stddev is stable. = fault_around 4096 = elapsed time(usec): 6747645 = fault_around 65536 = elapsed time(usec): 6709263 0.5% gain. Even when I tested it with eMMC there is no gain because I guess with slow storage the major fault is the dominant factor. Also, fault_around has the side effect of shrinking slab more aggressively and causes higher vmpressure, so if such speculation fails, it can evict slab more which can result in page I/O (e.g., inode cache). In the end, it would make void any benefit of fault_around. So let's make the default "disabled" on those architectures. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160518014229.GB21538@bbox Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: make faultaround produce old ptesKirill A. Shutemov3-7/+20
Currently, faultaround code produces young pte. This can screw up vmscan behaviour[1], as it makes vmscan think that these pages are hot and not push them out on first round. During sparse file access faultaround gets more pages mapped and all of them are young. Under memory pressure, this makes vmscan swap out anon pages instead, or to drop other page cache pages which otherwise stay resident. Modify faultaround to produce old ptes, so they can easily be reclaimed under memory pressure. This can to some extend defeat the purpose of faultaround on machines without hardware accessed bit as it will not help us with reducing the number of minor page faults. We may want to disable faultaround on such machines altogether, but that's subject for separate patchset. Minchan: "I tested 512M mmap sequential word read test on non-HW access bit system (i.e., ARM) and confirmed it doesn't increase minor fault any more. old: 4096 fault_around minor fault: 131291 elapsed time: 6747645 usec new: 65536 fault_around minor fault: 131291 elapsed time: 6709263 usec 0.56% benefit" [1] https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1460992636-711-1-git-send-email-vinmenon@codeaurora.org Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463488366-47723-1-git-send-email-kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com Signed-off-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Acked-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Tested-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org> Acked-by: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com> Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org> Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: use phys_addr_t for reserve_bootmem_region() argumentsStefan Bader2-2/+2
Since commit 92923ca3aace ("mm: meminit: only set page reserved in the memblock region") the reserved bit is set on reserved memblock regions. However start and end address are passed as unsigned long. This is only 32bit on i386, so it can end up marking the wrong pages reserved for ranges at 4GB and above. This was observed on a 32bit Xen dom0 which was booted with initial memory set to a value below 4G but allowing to balloon in memory (dom0_mem=1024M for example). This would define a reserved bootmem region for the additional memory (for example on a 8GB system there was a reverved region covering the 4GB-8GB range). But since the addresses were passed on as unsigned long, this was actually marking all pages from 0 to 4GB as reserved. Fixes: 92923ca3aacef63 ("mm: meminit: only set page reserved in the memblock region") Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1463491221-10573-1-git-send-email-stefan.bader@canonical.com Signed-off-by: Stefan Bader <stefan.bader@canonical.com> Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [4.2+] Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20userfaultfd: don't pin the user memory in userfaultfd_file_create()Oleg Nesterov2-14/+34
userfaultfd_file_create() increments mm->mm_users; this means that the memory won't be unmapped/freed if mm owner exits/execs, and UFFDIO_COPY after that can populate the orphaned mm more. Change userfaultfd_file_create() and userfaultfd_ctx_put() to use mm->mm_count to pin mm_struct. This means that atomic_inc_not_zero(mm->mm_users) is needed when we are going to actually play with this memory. Except handle_userfault() path doesn't need this, the caller must already have a reference. The patch adds the new trivial helper, mmget_not_zero(), it can have more users. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160516172254.GA8595@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com> Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm/memblock.c: remove unnecessary always-true comparisonRichard Leitner1-1/+1
Comparing an u64 variable to >= 0 returns always true and can therefore be removed. This issue was detected using the -Wtype-limits gcc flag. This patch fixes following type-limits warning: mm/memblock.c: In function `__next_reserved_mem_region': mm/memblock.c:843:11: warning: comparison of unsigned expression >= 0 is always true [-Wtype-limits] if (*idx >= 0 && *idx < type->cnt) { Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160510103625.3a7f8f32@g0hl1n.net Signed-off-by: Richard Leitner <dev@g0hl1n.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20z3fold: the 3-fold allocator for compressed pagesVitaly Wool4-1/+830
This patch introduces z3fold, a special purpose allocator for storing compressed pages. It is designed to store up to three compressed pages per physical page. It is a ZBUD derivative which allows for higher compression ratio keeping the simplicity and determinism of its predecessor. This patch comes as a follow-up to the discussions at the Embedded Linux Conference in San-Diego related to the talk [1]. The outcome of these discussions was that it would be good to have a compressed page allocator as stable and deterministic as zbud with with higher compression ratio. To keep the determinism and simplicity, z3fold, just like zbud, always stores an integral number of compressed pages per page, but it can store up to 3 pages unlike zbud which can store at most 2. Therefore the compression ratio goes to around 2.6x while zbud's one is around 1.7x. The patch is based on the latest linux.git tree. This version has been updated after testing on various simulators (e.g. ARM Versatile Express, MIPS Malta, x86_64/Haswell) and basing on comments from Dan Streetman [3]. [1] https://openiotelc2016.sched.org/event/6DAC/swapping-and-embedded-compression-relieves-the-pressure-vitaly-wool-softprise-consulting-ou [2] https://lkml.org/lkml/2016/4/21/799 [3] https://lkml.org/lkml/2016/5/4/852 Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160509151753.ec3f9fda3c9898d31ff52a32@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Vitaly Wool <vitalywool@gmail.com> Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com> Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org> Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: thp: split_huge_pmd_address() comment improvementAndrea Arcangeli1-2/+4
Comment is partly wrong, this improves it by including the case of split_huge_pmd_address() called by try_to_unmap_one if TTU_SPLIT_HUGE_PMD is set. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462547040-1737-4-git-send-email-aarcange@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com> Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Cc: Alex Williamson <alex.williamson@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: thp: microoptimize compound_mapcount()Andrea Arcangeli1-2/+1
compound_mapcount() is only called after PageCompound() has already been checked by the caller, so there's no point to check it again. Gcc may optimize it away too because it's inline but this will remove the runtime check for sure and add it'll add an assert instead. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462547040-1737-3-git-send-email-aarcange@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com> Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Cc: Alex Williamson <alex.williamson@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20vmstat: get rid of the ugly cpu_stat_off variableChristoph Lameter1-41/+10
The cpu_stat_off variable is unecessary since we can check if a workqueue request is pending otherwise. Removal of cpu_stat_off makes it pretty easy for the vmstat shepherd to ensure that the proper things happen. Removing the state also removes all races related to it. Should a workqueue not be scheduled as needed for vmstat_update then the shepherd will notice and schedule it as needed. Should a workqueue be unecessarily scheduled then the vmstat updater will disable it. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix indentation, per Michal] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.DEB.2.20.1605061306460.17934@east.gentwo.org Signed-off-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Tejun Heo <htejun@gmail.com> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Cc: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@I-love.SAKURA.ne.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20memcg: fix stale mem_cgroup_force_empty() commentGreg Thelen1-2/+1
Commit f61c42a7d911 ("memcg: remove tasks/children test from mem_cgroup_force_empty()") removed memory reparenting from the function. Fix the function's comment. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462569810-54496-1-git-send-email-gthelen@google.com Signed-off-by: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com> Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov@virtuozzo.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: use unsigned long constant for page flagsYu Zhao1-9/+9
struct page->flags is unsigned long, so when shifting bits we should use UL suffix to match it. Found this problem after I added 64-bit CPU specific page flags and failed to compile the kernel: mm/page_alloc.c: In function '__free_one_page': mm/page_alloc.c:672:2: error: integer overflow in expression [-Werror=overflow] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1461971723-16187-1-git-send-email-yuzhao@google.com Signed-off-by: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com> Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <n-horiguchi@ah.jp.nec.com> Cc: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Cc: Denys Vlasenko <dvlasenk@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: use existing helper to convert "on"/"off" to booleanMinfei Huang2-15/+2
It's more convenient to use existing function helper to convert string "on/off" to boolean. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1461908824-16129-1-git-send-email-mnghuan@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Minfei Huang <mnghuan@gmail.com> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm,writeback: don't use memory reserves for wb_start_writebackTetsuo Handa1-1/+2
When writeback operation cannot make forward progress because memory allocation requests needed for doing I/O cannot be satisfied (e.g. under OOM-livelock situation), we can observe flood of order-0 page allocation failure messages caused by complete depletion of memory reserves. This is caused by unconditionally allocating "struct wb_writeback_work" objects using GFP_ATOMIC from PF_MEMALLOC context. __alloc_pages_nodemask() { __alloc_pages_slowpath() { __alloc_pages_direct_reclaim() { __perform_reclaim() { current->flags |= PF_MEMALLOC; try_to_free_pages() { do_try_to_free_pages() { wakeup_flusher_threads() { wb_start_writeback() { kzalloc(sizeof(*work), GFP_ATOMIC) { /* ALLOC_NO_WATERMARKS via PF_MEMALLOC */ } } } } } current->flags &= ~PF_MEMALLOC; } } } } Since I/O is stalling, allocating writeback requests forever shall deplete memory reserves. Fortunately, since wb_start_writeback() can fall back to wb_wakeup() when allocating "struct wb_writeback_work" failed, we don't need to allow wb_start_writeback() to use memory reserves. Mem-Info: active_anon:289393 inactive_anon:2093 isolated_anon:29 active_file:10838 inactive_file:113013 isolated_file:859 unevictable:0 dirty:108531 writeback:5308 unstable:0 slab_reclaimable:5526 slab_unreclaimable:7077 mapped:9970 shmem:2159 pagetables:2387 bounce:0 free:3042 free_pcp:0 free_cma:0 Node 0 DMA free:6968kB min:44kB low:52kB high:64kB active_anon:6056kB inactive_anon:176kB active_file:712kB inactive_file:744kB unevictable:0kB isolated(anon):0kB isolated(file):0kB present:15988kB managed:15904kB mlocked:0kB dirty:756kB writeback:0kB mapped:736kB shmem:184kB slab_reclaimable:48kB slab_unreclaimable:208kB kernel_stack:160kB pagetables:144kB unstable:0kB bounce:0kB free_pcp:0kB local_pcp:0kB free_cma:0kB writeback_tmp:0kB pages_scanned:9708 all_unreclaimable? yes lowmem_reserve[]: 0 1732 1732 1732 Node 0 DMA32 free:5200kB min:5200kB low:6500kB high:7800kB active_anon:1151516kB inactive_anon:8196kB active_file:42640kB inactive_file:451076kB unevictable:0kB isolated(anon):116kB isolated(file):3564kB present:2080640kB managed:1775332kB mlocked:0kB dirty:433368kB writeback:21232kB mapped:39144kB shmem:8452kB slab_reclaimable:22056kB slab_unreclaimable:28100kB kernel_stack:20976kB pagetables:9404kB unstable:0kB bounce:0kB free_pcp:120kB local_pcp:0kB free_cma:0kB writeback_tmp:0kB pages_scanned:2701604 all_unreclaimable? no lowmem_reserve[]: 0 0 0 0 Node 0 DMA: 25*4kB (UME) 16*8kB (UME) 3*16kB (UE) 5*32kB (UME) 2*64kB (UM) 2*128kB (ME) 2*256kB (ME) 1*512kB (E) 1*1024kB (E) 2*2048kB (ME) 0*4096kB = 6964kB Node 0 DMA32: 925*4kB (UME) 140*8kB (UME) 5*16kB (ME) 5*32kB (M) 0*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 5060kB Node 0 hugepages_total=0 hugepages_free=0 hugepages_surp=0 hugepages_size=1048576kB Node 0 hugepages_total=0 hugepages_free=0 hugepages_surp=0 hugepages_size=2048kB 126847 total pagecache pages 0 pages in swap cache Swap cache stats: add 0, delete 0, find 0/0 Free swap = 0kB Total swap = 0kB 524157 pages RAM 0 pages HighMem/MovableOnly 76348 pages reserved 0 pages hwpoisoned Out of memory: Kill process 4450 (file_io.00) score 998 or sacrifice child Killed process 4450 (file_io.00) total-vm:4308kB, anon-rss:100kB, file-rss:1184kB, shmem-rss:0kB kthreadd: page allocation failure: order:0, mode:0x2200020 file_io.00: page allocation failure: order:0, mode:0x2200020 CPU: 0 PID: 4457 Comm: file_io.00 Not tainted 4.5.0-rc7+ #45 Hardware name: VMware, Inc. VMware Virtual Platform/440BX Desktop Reference Platform, BIOS 6.00 07/31/2013 Call Trace: warn_alloc_failed+0xf7/0x150 __alloc_pages_nodemask+0x23f/0xa60 alloc_pages_current+0x87/0x110 new_slab+0x3a1/0x440 ___slab_alloc+0x3cf/0x590 __slab_alloc.isra.64+0x18/0x1d kmem_cache_alloc+0x11c/0x150 wb_start_writeback+0x39/0x90 wakeup_flusher_threads+0x7f/0xf0 do_try_to_free_pages+0x1f9/0x410 try_to_free_pages+0x94/0xc0 __alloc_pages_nodemask+0x566/0xa60 alloc_pages_current+0x87/0x110 __page_cache_alloc+0xaf/0xc0 pagecache_get_page+0x88/0x260 grab_cache_page_write_begin+0x21/0x40 xfs_vm_write_begin+0x2f/0xf0 generic_perform_write+0xca/0x1c0 xfs_file_buffered_aio_write+0xcc/0x1f0 xfs_file_write_iter+0x84/0x140 __vfs_write+0xc7/0x100 vfs_write+0x9d/0x190 SyS_write+0x50/0xc0 entry_SYSCALL_64_fastpath+0x12/0x6a Mem-Info: active_anon:293335 inactive_anon:2093 isolated_anon:0 active_file:10829 inactive_file:110045 isolated_file:32 unevictable:0 dirty:109275 writeback:822 unstable:0 slab_reclaimable:5489 slab_unreclaimable:10070 mapped:9999 shmem:2159 pagetables:2420 bounce:0 free:3 free_pcp:0 free_cma:0 Node 0 DMA free:12kB min:44kB low:52kB high:64kB active_anon:6060kB inactive_anon:176kB active_file:708kB inactive_file:756kB unevictable:0kB isolated(anon):0kB isolated(file):0kB present:15988kB managed:15904kB mlocked:0kB dirty:756kB writeback:0kB mapped:736kB shmem:184kB slab_reclaimable:48kB slab_unreclaimable:7160kB kernel_stack:160kB pagetables:144kB unstable:0kB bounce:0kB free_pcp:0kB local_pcp:0kB free_cma:0kB writeback_tmp:0kB pages_scanned:9844 all_unreclaimable? yes lowmem_reserve[]: 0 1732 1732 1732 Node 0 DMA32 free:0kB min:5200kB low:6500kB high:7800kB active_anon:1167280kB inactive_anon:8196kB active_file:42608kB inactive_file:439424kB unevictable:0kB isolated(anon):0kB isolated(file):128kB present:2080640kB managed:1775332kB mlocked:0kB dirty:436344kB writeback:3288kB mapped:39260kB shmem:8452kB slab_reclaimable:21908kB slab_unreclaimable:33120kB kernel_stack:20976kB pagetables:9536kB unstable:0kB bounce:0kB free_pcp:0kB local_pcp:0kB free_cma:0kB writeback_tmp:0kB pages_scanned:11073180 all_unreclaimable? yes lowmem_reserve[]: 0 0 0 0 Node 0 DMA: 0*4kB 0*8kB 0*16kB 0*32kB 0*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 0kB Node 0 DMA32: 0*4kB 0*8kB 0*16kB 0*32kB 0*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 0kB Node 0 hugepages_total=0 hugepages_free=0 hugepages_surp=0 hugepages_size=1048576kB Node 0 hugepages_total=0 hugepages_free=0 hugepages_surp=0 hugepages_size=2048kB 123086 total pagecache pages 0 pages in swap cache Swap cache stats: add 0, delete 0, find 0/0 Free swap = 0kB Total swap = 0kB 524157 pages RAM 0 pages HighMem/MovableOnly 76348 pages reserved 0 pages hwpoisoned SLUB: Unable to allocate memory on node -1 (gfp=0x2088020) cache: kmalloc-64, object size: 64, buffer size: 64, default order: 0, min order: 0 node 0: slabs: 3218, objs: 205952, free: 0 file_io.00: page allocation failure: order:0, mode:0x2200020 CPU: 0 PID: 4457 Comm: file_io.00 Not tainted 4.5.0-rc7+ #45 Assuming that somebody will find a better solution, let's apply this patch for now to stop bleeding, for this problem frequently prevents me from testing OOM livelock condition. Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20160318131136.GE7152@quack.suse.cz Signed-off-by: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@I-love.SAKURA.ne.jp> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20Documentation: vm: fix spelling mistakesEric Engestrom1-6/+6
Signed-off-by: Eric Engestrom <eric@engestrom.ch> Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm fix commmets: if SPARSEMEM, pgdata doesn't have page_extWeijie Yang1-1/+1
If SPARSEMEM, use page_ext in mem_section if !SPARSEMEM, use page_ext in pgdata Signed-off-by: Weijie Yang <weijie.yang@samsung.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20include/linux/hugetlb.h: use bool instead of int for ↵Chen Gang1-3/+3
hugepage_migration_supported() It is used as a pure bool function within kernel source wide. Signed-off-by: Chen Gang <gang.chen.5i5j@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20include/linux/hugetlb*.h: clean up codeChen Gang2-7/+1
Macro HUGETLBFS_SB is clear enough, so one statement is clearer than 3 lines statements. Remove redundant return statements for non-return functions, which can save lines, at least. Signed-off-by: Chen Gang <gang.chen.5i5j@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>