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2016-06-24mm: mempool: kasan: don't poot mempool objects in quarantineAndrey Ryabinin1-4/+7
Currently we may put reserved by mempool elements into quarantine via kasan_kfree(). This is totally wrong since quarantine may really free these objects. So when mempool will try to use such element, use-after-free will happen. Or mempool may decide that it no longer need that element and double-free it. So don't put object into quarantine in kasan_kfree(), just poison it. Rename kasan_kfree() to kasan_poison_kfree() to respect that. Also, we shouldn't use kasan_slab_alloc()/kasan_krealloc() in kasan_unpoison_element() because those functions may update allocation stacktrace. This would be wrong for the most of the remove_element call sites. (The only call site where we may want to update alloc stacktrace is in mempool_alloc(). Kmemleak solves this by calling kmemleak_update_trace(), so we could make something like that too. But this is out of scope of this patch). Fixes: 55834c59098d ("mm: kasan: initial memory quarantine implementation") Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/575977C3.1010905@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Reported-by: Kuthonuzo Luruo <kuthonuzo.luruo@hpe.com> Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitriy Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Kostya Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: kasan: initial memory quarantine implementationAlexander Potapenko1-2/+11
Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. When the object is freed, its state changes from KASAN_STATE_ALLOC to KASAN_STATE_QUARANTINE. The object is poisoned and put into quarantine instead of being returned to the allocator, therefore every subsequent access to that object triggers a KASAN error, and the error handler is able to say where the object has been allocated and deallocated. When it's time for the object to leave quarantine, its state becomes KASAN_STATE_FREE and it's returned to the allocator. From now on the allocator may reuse it for another allocation. Before that happens, it's still possible to detect a use-after free on that object (it retains the allocation/deallocation stacks). When the allocator reuses this object, the shadow is unpoisoned and old allocation/deallocation stacks are wiped. Therefore a use of this object, even an incorrect one, won't trigger ASan warning. Without the quarantine, it's not guaranteed that the objects aren't reused immediately, that's why the probability of catching a use-after-free is lower than with quarantine in place. Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. Freed objects are first added to per-cpu quarantine queues. When a cache is destroyed or memory shrinking is requested, the objects are moved into the global quarantine queue. Whenever a kmalloc call allows memory reclaiming, the oldest objects are popped out of the global queue until the total size of objects in quarantine is less than 3/4 of the maximum quarantine size (which is a fraction of installed physical memory). As long as an object remains in the quarantine, KASAN is able to report accesses to it, so the chance of reporting a use-after-free is increased. Once the object leaves quarantine, the allocator may reuse it, in which case the object is unpoisoned and KASAN can't detect incorrect accesses to it. Right now quarantine support is only enabled in SLAB allocator. Unification of KASAN features in SLAB and SLUB will be done later. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: quarantine" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. A number of improvements have been suggested by Andrey Ryabinin. [glider@google.com: v9] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462987130-144092-1-git-send-email-glider@google.com Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-25mm, kasan: add GFP flags to KASAN APIAlexander Potapenko1-8/+11
Add GFP flags to KASAN hooks for future patches to use. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: unified support for SLUB and SLAB allocators" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-25mm, kasan: SLAB supportAlexander Potapenko1-0/+12
Add KASAN hooks to SLAB allocator. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: unified support for SLUB and SLAB allocators" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-09kasan: add functions to clear stack poisonMark Rutland1-1/+5
Functions which the compiler has instrumented for ASAN place poison on the stack shadow upon entry and remove this poison prior to returning. In some cases (e.g. hotplug and idle), CPUs may exit the kernel a number of levels deep in C code. If there are any instrumented functions on this critical path, these will leave portions of the idle thread stack shadow poisoned. If a CPU returns to the kernel via a different path (e.g. a cold entry), then depending on stack frame layout subsequent calls to instrumented functions may use regions of the stack with stale poison, resulting in (spurious) KASAN splats to the console. Contemporary GCCs always add stack shadow poisoning when ASAN is enabled, even when asked to not instrument a function [1], so we can't simply annotate functions on the critical path to avoid poisoning. Instead, this series explicitly removes any stale poison before it can be hit. In the common hotplug case we clear the entire stack shadow in common code, before a CPU is brought online. On architectures which perform a cold return as part of cpu idle may retain an architecture-specific amount of stack contents. To retain the poison for this retained context, the arch code must call the core KASAN code, passing a "watermark" stack pointer value beyond which shadow will be cleared. Architectures which don't perform a cold return as part of idle do not need any additional code. This patch (of 3): Functions which the compiler has instrumented for KASAN place poison on the stack shadow upon entry and remove this poision prior to returning. In some cases (e.g. hotplug and idle), CPUs may exit the kernel a number of levels deep in C code. If there are any instrumented functions on this critical path, these will leave portions of the stack shadow poisoned. If a CPU returns to the kernel via a different path (e.g. a cold entry), then depending on stack frame layout subsequent calls to instrumented functions may use regions of the stack with stale poison, resulting in (spurious) KASAN splats to the console. To avoid this, we must clear stale poison from the stack prior to instrumented functions being called. This patch adds functions to the KASAN core for removing poison from (portions of) a task's stack. These will be used by subsequent patches to avoid problems with hotplug and idle. Signed-off-by: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com> Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Reviewed-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Lorenzo Pieralisi <lorenzo.pieralisi@arm.com> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-08-22x86/kasan, mm: Introduce generic kasan_populate_zero_shadow()Andrey Ryabinin1-0/+9
Introduce generic kasan_populate_zero_shadow(shadow_start, shadow_end). This function maps kasan_zero_page to the [shadow_start, shadow_end] addresses. This replaces x86_64 specific populate_zero_shadow() and will be used for ARM64 in follow on patches. The main changes from original version are: * Use p?d_populate*() instead of set_p?d() * Use memblock allocator directly instead of vmemmap_alloc_block() * __pa() instead of __pa_nodebug(). __pa() causes troubles iff we use it before kasan_early_init(). kasan_populate_zero_shadow() will be used later, so we ok with __pa() here. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Alexey Klimov <klimov.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Cc: David Keitel <dkeitel@codeaurora.org> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Linus Walleij <linus.walleij@linaro.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yury <yury.norov@gmail.com> Cc: linux-arm-kernel@lists.infradead.org Cc: linux-mm@kvack.org Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1439444244-26057-3-git-send-email-ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
2015-08-22x86/kasan: Define KASAN_SHADOW_OFFSET per architectureAndrey Ryabinin1-1/+0
Current definition of KASAN_SHADOW_OFFSET in include/linux/kasan.h will not work for upcomming arm64, so move it to the arch header. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Alexey Klimov <klimov.linux@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: David Keitel <dkeitel@codeaurora.org> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Linus Walleij <linus.walleij@linaro.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> Cc: Yury <yury.norov@gmail.com> Cc: linux-arm-kernel@lists.infradead.org Cc: linux-mm@kvack.org Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1439444244-26057-2-git-send-email-ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
2015-04-15mm/mempool.c: kasan: poison mempool elementsAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+2
Mempools keep allocated objects in reserved for situations when ordinary allocation may not be possible to satisfy. These objects shouldn't be accessed before they leave the pool. This patch poison elements when get into the pool and unpoison when they leave it. This will let KASan to detect use-after-free of mempool's elements. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Tested-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <drcheren@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-03-12kasan, module: move MODULE_ALIGN macro into <linux/moduleloader.h>Andrey Ryabinin1-4/+0
include/linux/moduleloader.h is more suitable place for this macro. Also change alignment to PAGE_SIZE for CONFIG_KASAN=n as such alignment already assumed in several places. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Acked-by: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-03-12kasan, module, vmalloc: rework shadow allocation for modulesAndrey Ryabinin1-2/+3
Current approach in handling shadow memory for modules is broken. Shadow memory could be freed only after memory shadow corresponds it is no longer used. vfree() called from interrupt context could use memory its freeing to store 'struct llist_node' in it: void vfree(const void *addr) { ... if (unlikely(in_interrupt())) { struct vfree_deferred *p = this_cpu_ptr(&vfree_deferred); if (llist_add((struct llist_node *)addr, &p->list)) schedule_work(&p->wq); Later this list node used in free_work() which actually frees memory. Currently module_memfree() called in interrupt context will free shadow before freeing module's memory which could provoke kernel crash. So shadow memory should be freed after module's memory. However, such deallocation order could race with kasan_module_alloc() in module_alloc(). Free shadow right before releasing vm area. At this point vfree()'d memory is not used anymore and yet not available for other allocations. New VM_KASAN flag used to indicate that vm area has dynamically allocated shadow memory so kasan frees shadow only if it was previously allocated. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Acked-by: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-02-13kasan: enable instrumentation of global variablesAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+10
This feature let us to detect accesses out of bounds of global variables. This will work as for globals in kernel image, so for globals in modules. Currently this won't work for symbols in user-specified sections (e.g. __init, __read_mostly, ...) The idea of this is simple. Compiler increases each global variable by redzone size and add constructors invoking __asan_register_globals() function. Information about global variable (address, size, size with redzone ...) passed to __asan_register_globals() so we could poison variable's redzone. This patch also forces module_alloc() to return 8*PAGE_SIZE aligned address making shadow memory handling ( kasan_module_alloc()/kasan_module_free() ) more simple. Such alignment guarantees that each shadow page backing modules address space correspond to only one module_alloc() allocation. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Yuri Gribov <tetra2005@gmail.com> Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com> Cc: Sasha Levin <sasha.levin@oracle.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-02-13mm: slub: add kernel address sanitizer support for slub allocatorAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+27
With this patch kasan will be able to catch bugs in memory allocated by slub. Initially all objects in newly allocated slab page, marked as redzone. Later, when allocation of slub object happens, requested by caller number of bytes marked as accessible, and the rest of the object (including slub's metadata) marked as redzone (inaccessible). We also mark object as accessible if ksize was called for this object. There is some places in kernel where ksize function is called to inquire size of really allocated area. Such callers could validly access whole allocated memory, so it should be marked as accessible. Code in slub.c and slab_common.c files could validly access to object's metadata, so instrumentation for this files are disabled. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Signed-off-by: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Yuri Gribov <tetra2005@gmail.com> Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com> Cc: Sasha Levin <sasha.levin@oracle.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-02-13mm: page_alloc: add kasan hooks on alloc and free pathsAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+6
Add kernel address sanitizer hooks to mark allocated page's addresses as accessible in corresponding shadow region. Mark freed pages as inaccessible. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Yuri Gribov <tetra2005@gmail.com> Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com> Cc: Sasha Levin <sasha.levin@oracle.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-02-13kasan: add kernel address sanitizer infrastructureAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+46
Kernel Address sanitizer (KASan) is a dynamic memory error detector. It provides fast and comprehensive solution for finding use-after-free and out-of-bounds bugs. KASAN uses compile-time instrumentation for checking every memory access, therefore GCC > v4.9.2 required. v4.9.2 almost works, but has issues with putting symbol aliases into the wrong section, which breaks kasan instrumentation of globals. This patch only adds infrastructure for kernel address sanitizer. It's not available for use yet. The idea and some code was borrowed from [1]. Basic idea: The main idea of KASAN is to use shadow memory to record whether each byte of memory is safe to access or not, and use compiler's instrumentation to check the shadow memory on each memory access. Address sanitizer uses 1/8 of the memory addressable in kernel for shadow memory and uses direct mapping with a scale and offset to translate a memory address to its corresponding shadow address. Here is function to translate address to corresponding shadow address: unsigned long kasan_mem_to_shadow(unsigned long addr) { return (addr >> KASAN_SHADOW_SCALE_SHIFT) + KASAN_SHADOW_OFFSET; } where KASAN_SHADOW_SCALE_SHIFT = 3. So for every 8 bytes there is one corresponding byte of shadow memory. The following encoding used for each shadow byte: 0 means that all 8 bytes of the corresponding memory region are valid for access; k (1 <= k <= 7) means that the first k bytes are valid for access, and other (8 - k) bytes are not; Any negative value indicates that the entire 8-bytes are inaccessible. Different negative values used to distinguish between different kinds of inaccessible memory (redzones, freed memory) (see mm/kasan/kasan.h). To be able to detect accesses to bad memory we need a special compiler. Such compiler inserts a specific function calls (__asan_load*(addr), __asan_store*(addr)) before each memory access of size 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16. These functions check whether memory region is valid to access or not by checking corresponding shadow memory. If access is not valid an error printed. Historical background of the address sanitizer from Dmitry Vyukov: "We've developed the set of tools, AddressSanitizer (Asan), ThreadSanitizer and MemorySanitizer, for user space. We actively use them for testing inside of Google (continuous testing, fuzzing, running prod services). To date the tools have found more than 10'000 scary bugs in Chromium, Google internal codebase and various open-source projects (Firefox, OpenSSL, gcc, clang, ffmpeg, MySQL and lots of others): [2] [3] [4]. The tools are part of both gcc and clang compilers. We have not yet done massive testing under the Kernel AddressSanitizer (it's kind of chicken and egg problem, you need it to be upstream to start applying it extensively). To date it has found about 50 bugs. Bugs that we've found in upstream kernel are listed in [5]. We've also found ~20 bugs in out internal version of the kernel. Also people from Samsung and Oracle have found some. [...] As others noted, the main feature of AddressSanitizer is its performance due to inline compiler instrumentation and simple linear shadow memory. User-space Asan has ~2x slowdown on computational programs and ~2x memory consumption increase. Taking into account that kernel usually consumes only small fraction of CPU and memory when running real user-space programs, I would expect that kernel Asan will have ~10-30% slowdown and similar memory consumption increase (when we finish all tuning). I agree that Asan can well replace kmemcheck. We have plans to start working on Kernel MemorySanitizer that finds uses of unitialized memory. Asan+Msan will provide feature-parity with kmemcheck. As others noted, Asan will unlikely replace debug slab and pagealloc that can be enabled at runtime. Asan uses compiler instrumentation, so even if it is disabled, it still incurs visible overheads. Asan technology is easily portable to other architectures. Compiler instrumentation is fully portable. Runtime has some arch-dependent parts like shadow mapping and atomic operation interception. They are relatively easy to port." Comparison with other debugging features: ======================================== KMEMCHECK: - KASan can do almost everything that kmemcheck can. KASan uses compile-time instrumentation, which makes it significantly faster than kmemcheck. The only advantage of kmemcheck over KASan is detection of uninitialized memory reads. Some brief performance testing showed that kasan could be x500-x600 times faster than kmemcheck: $ netperf -l 30 MIGRATED TCP STREAM TEST from 0.0.0.0 (0.0.0.0) port 0 AF_INET to localhost (127.0.0.1) port 0 AF_INET Recv Send Send Socket Socket Message Elapsed Size Size Size Time Throughput bytes bytes bytes secs. 10^6bits/sec no debug: 87380 16384 16384 30.00 41624.72 kasan inline: 87380 16384 16384 30.00 12870.54 kasan outline: 87380 16384 16384 30.00 10586.39 kmemcheck: 87380 16384 16384 30.03 20.23 - Also kmemcheck couldn't work on several CPUs. It always sets number of CPUs to 1. KASan doesn't have such limitation. DEBUG_PAGEALLOC: - KASan is slower than DEBUG_PAGEALLOC, but KASan works on sub-page granularity level, so it able to find more bugs. SLUB_DEBUG (poisoning, redzones): - SLUB_DEBUG has lower overhead than KASan. - SLUB_DEBUG in most cases are not able to detect bad reads, KASan able to detect both reads and writes. - In some cases (e.g. redzone overwritten) SLUB_DEBUG detect bugs only on allocation/freeing of object. KASan catch bugs right before it will happen, so we always know exact place of first bad read/write. [1] https://code.google.com/p/address-sanitizer/wiki/AddressSanitizerForKernel [2] https://code.google.com/p/address-sanitizer/wiki/FoundBugs [3] https://code.google.com/p/thread-sanitizer/wiki/FoundBugs [4] https://code.google.com/p/memory-sanitizer/wiki/FoundBugs [5] https://code.google.com/p/address-sanitizer/wiki/AddressSanitizerForKernel#Trophies Based on work by Andrey Konovalov. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Acked-by: Michal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz> Signed-off-by: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Cc: Yuri Gribov <tetra2005@gmail.com> Cc: Konstantin Khlebnikov <koct9i@gmail.com> Cc: Sasha Levin <sasha.levin@oracle.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>