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2016-06-24mm: mempool: kasan: don't poot mempool objects in quarantineAndrey Ryabinin1-8/+4
Currently we may put reserved by mempool elements into quarantine via kasan_kfree(). This is totally wrong since quarantine may really free these objects. So when mempool will try to use such element, use-after-free will happen. Or mempool may decide that it no longer need that element and double-free it. So don't put object into quarantine in kasan_kfree(), just poison it. Rename kasan_kfree() to kasan_poison_kfree() to respect that. Also, we shouldn't use kasan_slab_alloc()/kasan_krealloc() in kasan_unpoison_element() because those functions may update allocation stacktrace. This would be wrong for the most of the remove_element call sites. (The only call site where we may want to update alloc stacktrace is in mempool_alloc(). Kmemleak solves this by calling kmemleak_update_trace(), so we could make something like that too. But this is out of scope of this patch). Fixes: 55834c59098d ("mm: kasan: initial memory quarantine implementation") Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/575977C3.1010905@virtuozzo.com Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Reported-by: Kuthonuzo Luruo <kuthonuzo.luruo@hpe.com> Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Dmitriy Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Kostya Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-05-20mm: kasan: initial memory quarantine implementationAlexander Potapenko1-1/+1
Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. When the object is freed, its state changes from KASAN_STATE_ALLOC to KASAN_STATE_QUARANTINE. The object is poisoned and put into quarantine instead of being returned to the allocator, therefore every subsequent access to that object triggers a KASAN error, and the error handler is able to say where the object has been allocated and deallocated. When it's time for the object to leave quarantine, its state becomes KASAN_STATE_FREE and it's returned to the allocator. From now on the allocator may reuse it for another allocation. Before that happens, it's still possible to detect a use-after free on that object (it retains the allocation/deallocation stacks). When the allocator reuses this object, the shadow is unpoisoned and old allocation/deallocation stacks are wiped. Therefore a use of this object, even an incorrect one, won't trigger ASan warning. Without the quarantine, it's not guaranteed that the objects aren't reused immediately, that's why the probability of catching a use-after-free is lower than with quarantine in place. Quarantine isolates freed objects in a separate queue. The objects are returned to the allocator later, which helps to detect use-after-free errors. Freed objects are first added to per-cpu quarantine queues. When a cache is destroyed or memory shrinking is requested, the objects are moved into the global quarantine queue. Whenever a kmalloc call allows memory reclaiming, the oldest objects are popped out of the global queue until the total size of objects in quarantine is less than 3/4 of the maximum quarantine size (which is a fraction of installed physical memory). As long as an object remains in the quarantine, KASAN is able to report accesses to it, so the chance of reporting a use-after-free is increased. Once the object leaves quarantine, the allocator may reuse it, in which case the object is unpoisoned and KASAN can't detect incorrect accesses to it. Right now quarantine support is only enabled in SLAB allocator. Unification of KASAN features in SLAB and SLUB will be done later. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: quarantine" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. A number of improvements have been suggested by Andrey Ryabinin. [glider@google.com: v9] Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1462987130-144092-1-git-send-email-glider@google.com Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-25mm, kasan: add GFP flags to KASAN APIAlexander Potapenko1-8/+8
Add GFP flags to KASAN hooks for future patches to use. This patch is based on the "mm: kasan: unified support for SLUB and SLAB allocators" patch originally prepared by Dmitry Chernenkov. Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com> Cc: Andrey Konovalov <adech.fo@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Konstantin Serebryany <kcc@google.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <dmitryc@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-17mm, mempool: only set __GFP_NOMEMALLOC if there are free elementsDavid Rientjes1-4/+16
If an oom killed thread calls mempool_alloc(), it is possible that it'll loop forever if there are no elements on the freelist since __GFP_NOMEMALLOC prevents it from accessing needed memory reserves in oom conditions. Only set __GFP_NOMEMALLOC if there are elements on the freelist. If there are no free elements, allow allocations without the bit set so that memory reserves can be accessed if needed. Additionally, using mempool_alloc() with __GFP_NOMEMALLOC is not supported since the implementation can loop forever without accessing memory reserves when needed. Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com> Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org> Cc: Tetsuo Handa <penguin-kernel@i-love.sakura.ne.jp> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2016-03-11mm/mempool: avoid KASAN marking mempool poison checks as use-after-freeMatthew Dawson1-1/+1
When removing an element from the mempool, mark it as unpoisoned in KASAN before verifying its contents for SLUB/SLAB debugging. Otherwise KASAN will flag the reads checking the element use-after-free writes as use-after-free reads. Signed-off-by: Matthew Dawson <matthew@mjdsystems.ca> Acked-by: Andrey Ryabinin <aryabinin@virtuozzo.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-11-06mm, page_alloc: distinguish between being unable to sleep, unwilling to ↵Mel Gorman1-5/+5
sleep and avoiding waking kswapd __GFP_WAIT has been used to identify atomic context in callers that hold spinlocks or are in interrupts. They are expected to be high priority and have access one of two watermarks lower than "min" which can be referred to as the "atomic reserve". __GFP_HIGH users get access to the first lower watermark and can be called the "high priority reserve". Over time, callers had a requirement to not block when fallback options were available. Some have abused __GFP_WAIT leading to a situation where an optimisitic allocation with a fallback option can access atomic reserves. This patch uses __GFP_ATOMIC to identify callers that are truely atomic, cannot sleep and have no alternative. High priority users continue to use __GFP_HIGH. __GFP_DIRECT_RECLAIM identifies callers that can sleep and are willing to enter direct reclaim. __GFP_KSWAPD_RECLAIM to identify callers that want to wake kswapd for background reclaim. __GFP_WAIT is redefined as a caller that is willing to enter direct reclaim and wake kswapd for background reclaim. This patch then converts a number of sites o __GFP_ATOMIC is used by callers that are high priority and have memory pools for those requests. GFP_ATOMIC uses this flag. o Callers that have a limited mempool to guarantee forward progress clear __GFP_DIRECT_RECLAIM but keep __GFP_KSWAPD_RECLAIM. bio allocations fall into this category where kswapd will still be woken but atomic reserves are not used as there is a one-entry mempool to guarantee progress. o Callers that are checking if they are non-blocking should use the helper gfpflags_allow_blocking() where possible. This is because checking for __GFP_WAIT as was done historically now can trigger false positives. Some exceptions like dm-crypt.c exist where the code intent is clearer if __GFP_DIRECT_RECLAIM is used instead of the helper due to flag manipulations. o Callers that built their own GFP flags instead of starting with GFP_KERNEL and friends now also need to specify __GFP_KSWAPD_RECLAIM. The first key hazard to watch out for is callers that removed __GFP_WAIT and was depending on access to atomic reserves for inconspicuous reasons. In some cases it may be appropriate for them to use __GFP_HIGH. The second key hazard is callers that assembled their own combination of GFP flags instead of starting with something like GFP_KERNEL. They may now wish to specify __GFP_KSWAPD_RECLAIM. It's almost certainly harmless if it's missed in most cases as other activity will wake kswapd. Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net> Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com> Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Vitaly Wool <vitalywool@gmail.com> Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-09-08mm/mempool: allow NULL `pool' pointer in mempool_destroy()Sergey Senozhatsky1-0/+3
mempool_destroy() does not tolerate a NULL mempool_t pointer argument and performs a NULL-pointer dereference. This requires additional attention and effort from developers/reviewers and forces all mempool_destroy() callers to do a NULL check if (pool) mempool_destroy(pool); Or, otherwise, be invalid mempool_destroy() users. Tweak mempool_destroy() and NULL-check the pointer there. Proposed by Andrew Morton. Link: https://lkml.org/lkml/2015/6/8/583 Signed-off-by: Sergey Senozhatsky <sergey.senozhatsky@gmail.com> Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Julia Lawall <julia.lawall@lip6.fr> Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-04-15mm/mempool.c: kasan: poison mempool elementsAndrey Ryabinin1-0/+23
Mempools keep allocated objects in reserved for situations when ordinary allocation may not be possible to satisfy. These objects shouldn't be accessed before they leave the pool. This patch poison elements when get into the pool and unpoison when they leave it. This will let KASan to detect use-after-free of mempool's elements. Signed-off-by: Andrey Ryabinin <a.ryabinin@samsung.com> Tested-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Cc: Dmitry Chernenkov <drcheren@gmail.com> Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com> Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-04-15mm, mempool: poison elements backed by slab allocatorDavid Rientjes1-2/+90
Mempools keep elements in a reserved pool for contexts in which allocation may not be possible. When an element is allocated from the reserved pool, its memory contents is the same as when it was added to the reserved pool. Because of this, elements lack any free poisoning to detect use-after-free errors. This patch adds free poisoning for elements backed by the slab allocator. This is possible because the mempool layer knows the object size of each element. When an element is added to the reserved pool, it is poisoned with POISON_FREE. When it is removed from the reserved pool, the contents are checked for POISON_FREE. If there is a mismatch, a warning is emitted to the kernel log. This is only effective for configs with CONFIG_DEBUG_SLAB or CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG_ON. [fabio.estevam@freescale.com: use '%zu' for printing 'size_t' variable] [arnd@arndb.de: add missing include] Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Dave Kleikamp <shaggy@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Sebastian Ott <sebott@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Mikulas Patocka <mpatocka@redhat.com> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Signed-off-by: Fabio Estevam <fabio.estevam@freescale.com> Signed-off-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-04-15mm, mempool: disallow mempools based on slab caches with constructorsDavid Rientjes1-0/+2
All occurrences of mempools based on slab caches with object constructors have been removed from the tree, so disallow creating them. We can only dereference mem->ctor in mm/mempool.c without including mm/slab.h in include/linux/mempool.h. So simply note the restriction, just like the comment restricting usage of __GFP_ZERO, and warn on kernels with CONFIG_DEBUG_VM() if such a mempool is allocated from. We don't want to incur this check on every element allocation, so use VM_BUG_ON(). Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Dave Kleikamp <shaggy@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Sebastian Ott <sebott@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Mikulas Patocka <mpatocka@redhat.com> Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2015-04-14mm, mempool: do not allow atomic resizingDavid Rientjes1-4/+6
Allocating a large number of elements in atomic context could quickly deplete memory reserves, so just disallow atomic resizing entirely. Nothing currently uses mempool_resize() with anything other than GFP_KERNEL, so convert existing callers to drop the gfp_mask. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Acked-by: Steffen Maier <maier@linux.vnet.ibm.com> [zfcp] Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Steve French <sfrench@samba.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2014-06-06mm/mempool.c: update the kmemleak stack trace for mempool allocationsCatalin Marinas1-0/+6
When mempool_alloc() returns an existing pool object, kmemleak_alloc() is no longer called and the stack trace corresponds to the original object allocation. This patch updates the kmemleak allocation stack trace for such objects to make it more useful for debugging. Signed-off-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2014-06-04mm/mempool: warn about __GFP_ZERO usageSebastian Ott1-0/+2
Memory obtained via mempool_alloc is not always zeroed even when called with __GFP_ZERO. Add a note and VM_BUG_ON statement to make that clear. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: use VM_WARN_ON_ONCE] Signed-off-by: Sebastian Ott <sebott@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2014-04-07mempool: add unlikely and likely hintsMikulas Patocka1-2/+2
Add unlikely and likely hints to the function mempool_free. It lays out the code in such a way that the common path is executed straighforward and saves a cache line. Signed-off-by: Mikulas Patocka <mpatocka@redhat.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2013-09-11mm/mempool.c: convert kmalloc_node(...GFP_ZERO...) to kzalloc_node(...)Joe Perches1-1/+1
Use the helper function instead of __GFP_ZERO. Signed-off-by: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2012-06-25mempool: add @gfp_mask to mempool_create_node()Tejun Heo1-5/+7
mempool_create_node() currently assumes %GFP_KERNEL. Its only user, blk_init_free_list(), is about to be updated to use other allocation flags - add @gfp_mask argument to the function. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
2012-01-10mempool: fix first round failure behaviorTejun Heo1-2/+11
mempool modifies gfp_mask so that the backing allocator doesn't try too hard or trigger warning message when there's pool to fall back on. In addition, for the first try, it removes __GFP_WAIT and IO, so that it doesn't trigger reclaim or wait when allocation can be fulfilled from pool; however, when that allocation fails and pool is empty too, it waits for the pool to be replenished before retrying. Allocation which could have succeeded after a bit of reclaim has to wait on the reserved items and it's not like mempool doesn't retry with __GFP_WAIT and IO. It just does that *after* someone returns an element, pointlessly delaying things. Fix it by retrying immediately if the first round of allocation attempts w/o __GFP_WAIT and IO fails. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: shorten the lock hold time] Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2012-01-10mempool: drop unnecessary and incorrect BUG_ON() from mempool_destroy()Tejun Heo1-19/+11
mempool_destroy() is a thin wrapper around free_pool(). The only thing it adds is BUG_ON(pool->curr_nr != pool->min_nr). The intention seems to be to enforce that all allocated elements are freed; however, the BUG_ON() can't achieve that (it doesn't know anything about objects above min_nr) and incorrect as mempool_resize() is allowed to leave the pool extended but not filled. Furthermore, panicking is way worse than any memory leak and there are better debug tools to track memory leaks. Drop the BUG_ON() from mempool_destory() and as that leaves the function identical to free_pool(), replace it. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2012-01-10mempool: fix and document synchronization and memory barrier usageTejun Heo1-13/+48
mempool_alloc/free() use undocumented smp_mb()'s. The code is slightly broken and misleading. The lockless part is in mempool_free(). It wants to determine whether the item being freed needs to be returned to the pool or backing allocator without grabbing pool->lock. Two things need to be guaranteed for correct operation. 1. pool->curr_nr + #allocated should never dip below pool->min_nr. 2. Waiters shouldn't be left dangling. For #1, The only necessary condition is that curr_nr visible at free is from after the allocation of the element being freed (details in the comment). For most cases, this is true without any barrier but there can be fringe cases where the allocated pointer is passed to the freeing task without going through memory barriers. To cover this case, wmb is necessary before returning from allocation and rmb is necessary before reading curr_nr. IOW, ALLOCATING TASK FREEING TASK update pool state after alloc; wmb(); pass pointer to freeing task; read pointer; rmb(); read pool state to free; The current code doesn't have wmb after pool update during allocation and may theoretically, on machines where unlock doesn't behave as full wmb, lead to pool depletion and deadlock. smp_wmb() needs to be added after successful allocation from reserved elements and smp_mb() in mempool_free() can be replaced with smp_rmb(). For #2, the waiter needs to add itself to waitqueue and then check the wait condition and the waker needs to update the wait condition and then wake up. Because waitqueue operations always go through full spinlock synchronization, there is no need for extra memory barriers. Furthermore, mempool_alloc() is already holding pool->lock when it decides that it needs to wait. There is no reason to do unlock - add waitqueue - test condition again. It can simply add itself to waitqueue while holding pool->lock and then unlock and sleep. This patch adds smp_wmb() after successful allocation from reserved pool, replaces smp_mb() in mempool_free() with smp_rmb() and extend pool->lock over waitqueue addition. More importantly, it explains what memory barriers do and how the lockless testing is correct. -v2: Oleg pointed out that unlock doesn't imply wmb. Added explicit smp_wmb() after successful allocation from reserved pool and updated comments accordingly. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com> Cc: "Paul E. McKenney" <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2011-10-31mm: Map most files to use export.h instead of module.hPaul Gortmaker1-1/+1
The files changed within are only using the EXPORT_SYMBOL macro variants. They are not using core modular infrastructure and hence don't need module.h but only the export.h header. Signed-off-by: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com>
2009-09-22mm: remove broken 'kzalloc' mempoolSage Weil1-7/+0
The kzalloc mempool zeros items when they are initially allocated, but does not rezero used items that are returned to the pool. Consequently mempool_alloc()s may return non-zeroed memory. Since there are/were only two in-tree users for mempool_create_kzalloc_pool(), and 'fixing' this in a way that will re-zero used (but not new) items before first use is non-trivial, just remove it. Signed-off-by: Sage Weil <sage@newdream.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2009-08-10mempool.c: clean up type-castingFigo.zhang1-2/+2
clean up type-casting twice. "size_t" is typedef as "unsigned long" in 64-bit system, and "unsigned int" in 32-bit system, and the intermediate cast to 'long' is pointless. Signed-off-by: Figo.zhang <figo1802@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2007-10-20spelling fixes: mm/Simon Arlott1-1/+1
Spelling fixes in mm/. Signed-off-by: Simon Arlott <simon@fire.lp0.eu> Signed-off-by: Adrian Bunk <bunk@kernel.org>
2007-07-17Slab allocators: Replace explicit zeroing with __GFP_ZEROChristoph Lameter1-2/+1
kmalloc_node() and kmem_cache_alloc_node() were not available in a zeroing variant in the past. But with __GFP_ZERO it is possible now to do zeroing while allocating. Use __GFP_ZERO to remove the explicit clearing of memory via memset whereever we can. Signed-off-by: Christoph Lameter <clameter@sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2007-07-16permit mempool_free(NULL)Rusty Russell1-0/+3
Christian Borntraeger points out that mempool_free() doesn't noop when handed NULL. This is inconsistent with the other free-like functions in the kernel. Signed-off-by: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2007-02-11[PATCH] Numerous fixes to kernel-doc info in source files.Robert P. J. Day1-3/+3
A variety of (mostly) innocuous fixes to the embedded kernel-doc content in source files, including: * make multi-line initial descriptions single line * denote some function names, constants and structs as such * change erroneous opening '/*' to '/**' in a few places * reword some text for clarity Signed-off-by: Robert P. J. Day <rpjday@mindspring.com> Cc: "Randy.Dunlap" <rdunlap@xenotime.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2006-09-01[PATCH] dm: work around mempool_alloc, bio_alloc_bioset deadlocksPavel Mironchik1-2/+7
This patch works around a complex dm-related deadlock/livelock down in the mempool allocator. Alasdair said: Several dm targets suffer from this. Mempools are not yet used correctly everywhere in device-mapper: they can get shared when devices are stacked, and some targets share them across multiple instances. I made fixing this one of the prerequisites for this patch: md-dm-reduce-stack-usage-with-stacked-block-devices.patch which in some cases makes people more likely to hit the problem. There's been some progress on this recently with (unfinished) dm-crypt patches at: http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/agk/patches/2.6/editing/ (dm-crypt-move-io-to-workqueue.patch plus dependencies) and: I've no problems with a temporary workaround like that, but Milan Broz (a new Redhat developer in the Czech Republic) has started reviewing all the mempool usage in device-mapper so I'm expecting we'll soon have a proper fix for this associated problems. [He's back from holiday at the start of next week.] For now, this sad-but-safe little patch will allow the machine to recover. [akpm@osdl.org: rewrote changelog] Cc: Alasdair G Kergon <agk@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-03-26Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/bunk/trivialLinus Torvalds1-2/+2
* git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/bunk/trivial: drivers/char/ftape/lowlevel/fdc-io.c: Correct a comment Kconfig help: MTD_JEDECPROBE already supports Intel Remove ugly debugging stuff do_mounts.c: Minor ROOT_DEV comment cleanup BUG_ON() Conversion in drivers/s390/block/dasd_devmap.c BUG_ON() Conversion in mm/mempool.c BUG_ON() Conversion in mm/memory.c BUG_ON() Conversion in kernel/fork.c BUG_ON() Conversion in ipc/sem.c BUG_ON() Conversion in fs/ext2/ BUG_ON() Conversion in fs/hfs/ BUG_ON() Conversion in fs/dcache.c BUG_ON() Conversion in fs/buffer.c BUG_ON() Conversion in input/serio/hp_sdc_mlc.c BUG_ON() Conversion in md/dm-table.c BUG_ON() Conversion in md/dm-path-selector.c BUG_ON() Conversion in drivers/isdn BUG_ON() Conversion in drivers/char BUG_ON() Conversion in drivers/mtd/
2006-03-26[PATCH] mempool: add kzalloc allocatorMatthew Dobson1-1/+8
Add another allocator to the common mempool code: a kzalloc/kfree allocator This will be used by the next patch in the series to replace a mempool-backed kzalloc allocator. It is also very likely that there will be more users in the future. Signed-off-by: Matthew Dobson <colpatch@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-03-26[PATCH] mempool: add kmalloc allocatorMatthew Dobson1-0/+17
Add another allocator to the common mempool code: a kmalloc/kfree allocator This will be used by the next patch in the series to replace duplicate mempool-backed kmalloc allocators in several places in the kernel. It is also very likely that there will be more users in the future. Signed-off-by: Matthew Dobson <colpatch@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-03-26[PATCH] mempool: add page allocatorMatthew Dobson1-0/+18
This will be used by the next patch in the series to replace duplicate mempool-backed page allocators in 2 places in the kernel. It is also likely that there will be more users in the future. Signed-off-by: Matthew Dobson <colpatch@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-03-26BUG_ON() Conversion in mm/mempool.cEric Sesterhenn1-2/+2
this changes if() BUG(); constructs to BUG_ON() which is cleaner, contains unlikely() and can better optimized away. Signed-off-by: Eric Sesterhenn <snakebyte@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Adrian Bunk <bunk@stusta.de>
2006-03-22[PATCH] mm: kill kmem_cache_t usagePekka Enberg1-2/+2
We have struct kmem_cache now so use it instead of the old typedef. Signed-off-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-10-28[PATCH] gfp_t: mm/* (easy parts)Al Viro1-1/+1
Signed-off-by: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-10-08[PATCH] gfp flags annotations - part 1Al Viro1-3/+3
- added typedef unsigned int __nocast gfp_t; - replaced __nocast uses for gfp flags with gfp_t - it gives exactly the same warnings as far as sparse is concerned, doesn't change generated code (from gcc point of view we replaced unsigned int with typedef) and documents what's going on far better. Signed-off-by: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-07-07[PATCH] propagate __nocast annotationsAlexey Dobriyan1-1/+1
Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-06-23[PATCH] mempool - only init waitqueue in slow pathBenjamin LaHaise1-1/+2
Here's a small patch to improve the performance of mempool_alloc by only initializing the wait queue when we're about to wait. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <benjamin.c.lahaise@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-06-23[PATCH] NUMA aware block device control structure allocationChristoph Lameter1-5/+12
Patch to allocate the control structures for for ide devices on the node of the device itself (for NUMA systems). The patch depends on the Slab API change patch by Manfred and me (in mm) and the pcidev_to_node patch that I posted today. Does some realignment too. Signed-off-by: Justin M. Forbes <jmforbes@linuxtx.org> Signed-off-by: Christoph Lameter <christoph@lameter.com> Signed-off-by: Pravin Shelar <pravin@calsoftinc.com> Signed-off-by: Shobhit Dayal <shobhit@calsoftinc.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-05-01[PATCH] use smp_mb/wmb/rmb where possibleakpm@osdl.org1-2/+2
Replace a number of memory barriers with smp_ variants. This means we won't take the unnecessary hit on UP machines. Signed-off-by: Anton Blanchard <anton@samba.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-05-01[PATCH] mempool: simplify allocNick Piggin1-21/+9
Mempool is pretty clever. Looks too clever for its own good :) It shouldn't really know so much about page reclaim internals. - don't guess about what effective page reclaim might involve. - don't randomly flush out all dirty data if some unlikely thing happens (alloc returns NULL). page reclaim can (sort of :P) handle it. I think the main motivation is trying to avoid pool->lock at all costs. However the first allocation is attempted with __GFP_WAIT cleared, so it will be 'can_try_harder' if it hits the page allocator. So if allocation still fails, then we can probably afford to hit the pool->lock - and what's the alternative? Try page reclaim and hit zone->lru_lock? A nice upshot is that we don't need to do any fancy memory barriers or do (intentionally) racy access to pool-> fields outside the lock. Signed-off-by: Nick Piggin <nickpiggin@yahoo.com.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-05-01[PATCH] mempool: NOMEMALLOC and NORETRYNick Piggin1-2/+7
Mempools have 2 problems. The first is that mempool_alloc can possibly get stuck in __alloc_pages when they should opt to fail, and take an element from their reserved pool. The second is that it will happily eat emergency PF_MEMALLOC reserves instead of going to their reserved pools. Fix the first by passing __GFP_NORETRY in the allocation calls in mempool_alloc. Fix the second by introducing a __GFP_MEMPOOL flag which directs the page allocator not to allocate from the reserve pool. Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2005-04-16Linux-2.6.12-rc2Linus Torvalds1-0/+290
Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history, even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about 3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good infrastructure for it. Let it rip!